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Whoever is in the pollination industry. Take notice of the following "alternative pollination solution". It is a company from Israel that successfully found a way to pollinate almonds artificially. And they target especially the US almond pollination industry.

Quote: "Developed open and cooperative relationships with leading almond growers in the main almond markets - USA and Australia"

https://www.edetepta.com/our-solution

:scratch:
This company has not found a way to successfully pollinate any orchard or crop. Read the details and come up with your own summary. According to their website, they ONLY extract available male pollen by harvesting the entire flower. The pollen is processed, labeled according to variety, and stored for use the following pollination year. This stored pollen has to be "blown on" to every female flower at the appropriate time in order to achieve desired results. This process has been in place for many years now(Firman Pollen, Antles Pollen) nothing new.

Negative to this system is you need to convince any grower to pay for having this pollen blown on to the orchard at the correct time x approx. million bearing acres. Pollen can not be blown on anything while it is raining or heavy fog as pollen is lighter weight than water/fog.

a. What is the actual cost variable to any grower who has to rent/buy a special blower to attach to their tractor or atv ?
b. What is the cost of purchasing this processed pollen on a per acre basis ?
c. Any grower will need to analyze if renting honey bees for pollination versus buying/renting a machine, plus labor costs for spraying and purchasing processed pollen.

I believe as beekeepers we are safe from any potential mechanical intrusion that may or may not disrupt our God given pollinating species.
 

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Hope you are right. :)

When I was a kid, we didn't have mobile phones nor smart phones. And today...they don't simply blow pollen into the tree, they managed to target individual blossoms while they blow the pollen. That's a step further I reckon'.

Besides the costs, there are benefits for the industry not be overlooked.

1. First you can spray whatever pesticide you want and whenever you want, without caring for the bees.

2. Pollen could be licensed as are seeds today.

3. With those heavy winter losses the supply with bee hives is unstable.

And so on.

If they can do it, they'll do it.
 

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The viability of pollen is negatively impacted by humidity. And rain.

Alex
 

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I would say "alternate pollination" as described here would have about the same impact on commercial pollination as instrumental insemination of queens does to the commercial mated queen market.
 

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I'd like to see them try as I see it as a logistical nightmare.... I can see it as a good alternative when bees are scarce, but if bees are available, why risk it. Even on the flipside, you can't apply pollen in bad weather or cold weather, the flowers wouldn't be receptive anyway...
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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That is kinda they way I see it. An alternative to bee pollination when bees are unavailable. Nothing beats the natural way, no matter how innovative we become.
 
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