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I wanted to ask about this...

What do you think?

How much you think the survival rate of colonies improves once someone gets away from the pesticide ridden pollination runs?

And also how long will the chemicals stay in the bees, after coming back from pollination (CA almond groves, etc)? (Months, generations, etc?)


I'm not anti-pollination. And I understand you want to make a living. And I also don't intent to use this information to cause any harm or steal anyone's job. I'm only interested in figuring out my own options for over-wintering and personal preferences in management. And in asking about it, I already know much about it, so talking about it shouldn't put anyone out of money, OK.

(Also I'm mostly referring to the big commercial farms out of town, not going down the road to some ma and pa orchard 10 miles from home. But yes, I understand those do use pesticides also.Thanks.)

Plus, actually I don't really want to be one of the guys on the road.
 

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I would think the transportation and poor nutrition (like from almond flowers) would have significantly more effect on the bees than pesticide residuals. Spraying typically doesn't occur during the pollination season.
 

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One of the very best things that happens to our honey bee's health is the trip to almonds every year.
We pick them up out of the cold, rainy icebox here at home and move them into sunny California.
The very next day, they are hauling in fresh pollen and the tight winter cluster expands.
Almond nectar and pollen is highly nutritious and the bees come home bursting at the seams..
"pesticide ridden pollination runs? " I have no idea of such an activity.
Sounds like an urban legend.
 
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