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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is pollen always indicative of a necter flow? The bees are bringing in loads of pollen now, maybe from elm, but does this necessarily mean the beginning of a flow? If yes, I guess its time to began supering and reversing if I'm going to do it. If not, those manipulations can perhaps wait? I guess there wouldn't be any harm in supering up now with drawn frames would there?
 

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Pollen doesn't always = necter. There are many polllen producing flowers with zero necter. Elms is a great example. That is one of thier first real pollen sources here, but no necter. Dandilions are blooming here and produce both. Not enough for a surplus. Pollen + necter gets the queen going good for build up.

A few problems with supering now are. Defense. There are not a whole lot of bees to defend that extra area. Temps. Heat rises. That's a lot of extra area to add and have them keep the hive warm. If you are feeding. When they are ready ( a good necter flow coming in) they will stop taking the feed. Then it's super time. Still a couple/3 weeks out I think.
 

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Derek is correct. Just because you see the bun doesn't mean the burger is in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Beeslave and Hambone, exactly the info I needed. I'll restrain myself and hold off for a little while longer, keeping watch on how well they are using the supplied syrup.
 

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How are you getting pollen 1.5 hrs. north of me. There isn't anything producing where I'm at:scratch:

Usually elm is the first thing to pop around here, but it produces pollen only.
 

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When there is a flow going on if you pull a frame out of the brood nest(with open cells containg liquid), turn the frame so the cells are vertical, and give the frame a quick downward shake with a fast stop. If nectar drops out of the frame you have a flow going. If every frame pours out nectar you have a major flow. If only a few frames do that it is a minor flow or you just have a weak colony. If nothing shakes out of any frame then there is no flow. Later in the season when the brood boxes are full and the bees are working honey supers above, just pull frames from the honey super with open cells. If the honey doesn't shake out the bees have lowered the moisture so it has been in there for a while. If it does shake out they are presently working something that is producing nectar for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello ACbees. My bees are either in my back yard or at my new location along a creek. Lots of elms in both locations. If your's are out on the prarie that might explain the absence of pollen. There's not much this time of year near Shallowater.
 

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Are your elms budding? Most of the ones around here are not. Though that will be changing in the next 7-10 days.
 

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For weeks now my girls have been brining in tons of pollen, at first a dirty white pollen and now yellow. Definitely gearing up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hambone, our elms are flowering now. The buds have been swelled for a couple of weeks but Tuesday of this week, I saw some where you could actually see the anthers w/pollen.
 
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