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I am looking to start collecting pollen this year,, can anyone recommend a good pollen trap and suggestions as to it's use ???????
 

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I recommend the Sundance trap with rear tray (top or bottom). Top will yield cleaner pollen, but it will be hard to train the bees, if they aren't already using a top entrance.

Do not get the side mount tray (unless you are running pallets), as they limit your collection. Due to the design, it causes the pollen to mound up quickly in a smaller collection tray and you will lose pollen.

Another tip, do not be tempted to try and turn the trap "off and on" frequently thinking you will make it easier on the bees. This can stress the bees out. The bees sometimes need a week to get acclimated. Once they are collecting, keep it going for 2-4 weeks during a good pollen flow. You really don't have to worry about the bees not having enough pollen. Not all pollen is stripped, and once the hive detects that there is not enough pollen coming in, workers switch to pollen gathering from nectar to maintain the correct balance.

We have always had good success collecting in the summer. We do not collect in late summer/fall. During humid months, you really should be collecting every day. A good hive for us produces approx. 1.5 lbs a day.

All collection hives have done well and wintered fine for us when we adhere to a good schedule.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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The cleanest pollen is from the top one, but if you don't already have a top entrance, it's probably not your best bet. It's hard enough to train them to go through a pollen trap without changing entrance location at the same time... I like the Sundance II top one a lot. I've inherited and bought a few different ones and they all work to some degree, but the Sundance is the most well thought out one with the cleanest pollen and the most "throughput". The drone escapes really speed up things for the departing bees, who quickly learn to bypass the trap on the way out.
 
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