Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have two hives right next to one another why would 1 have a bunch of pollen coming in and the other has none coming in. The hive I don’t see any pollen coming in actually has more bees in it than the other one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,480 Posts
That would be concerning to me;( Some possible reasons I can come up with, one hive is not raising brood (possibly queen less, or the queen is not laying as many eggs, as the other). You are just missing the pollen they are bringing in, or they haven't found the pollen source yet:scratch:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That would be concerning to me;( Some possible reasons I can come up with, one hive is not raising brood (possibly queen less, or the queen is not laying as many eggs, as the other). You are just missing the pollen they are bringing in, or they haven't found the pollen source yet
. Well you were spot on went in and not a single egg or capped brood. Is it possible they made it through the winter without a queen? I pulled a couple of frames of brood from my other hive and gave it to them to make a queen. they have plenty of bees to keep that brood warm. Another funny thing 20 min after I closed them up loads of pollen coming in. Well at least I don’t have to worry about that hive swarming LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,536 Posts
Giving them a frame of brood to make a queen before you have ample drones to mate with her (and drones take much longer than queens to reach sexual maturity) will be a waste of time and resources. What you need to do is purchase an already-mated queen. Or to combine the two colonies into a really big colony with a planned early re-split once you have drones or can can find a mated queen for sale. If it's too early for drones, adding a frame of brood may only serve the purpose of suppressing laying workers, though I am not sure LW-problems are as significant an issue in winter as they are in warmer weather.

Is this the first time you have been in the colony since last fall? If so, then you know you lost the queen sometime since then. If you have done any manipulations at all, even feeding patty or bricks, you may have accidentally harmed her. This is one of the risks of early frame-pulling: harming a queen, usually without even realizing it. Only to discover a queenless hive several weeks or a month or more later, when you can work more readily. In warm weather, you are much more likely to discover the problem promptly, and be able to fix it more easily.

Before combining, I would look very long and hard to make sure that in addition to not having any evidence of brood, you are also actually queenless, not just functionally queenless, but with a sub-par queen. I wouldn't want to take any risk of harming the queen in the pollen-hauling hive.

Good luck!

Nancy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Nancy always great to hear from you hope all is well. No I was in the hive about a month and a half ago to add winter patties. Didn’t pull any frames just laid them on top of the honey super. Did a pretty thorough inspection didn’t see the queen. I do believe they are queenless because the bee's just hang out in front of the entrance and act lethargic. I guess I could try to go through it again next week and make sure there is no queen. If they do have a queen that is not laying what should I do? If they don't Betterbee has queens available on the 24th. Should I go back in and remove the brood frames i put in? Or order a queen and just install her on the 24th?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top