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Can anyone point me to a source for finding the value of pollen, to bees, from different species?

Currently about 99% of the incoming pollen is a creamy white and most of the bee bread in the combs are similar in color. I think that the current pollen is coming from the Mexican Fan Palm because I've observed the foraging with binoculars. However, I haven't been able to find a source to determine if that is a high quality pollen. A similar colored pollen appeared to be from Japanese privet earlier this summer. Any guidance is appreciated.
 

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Randy Oliver on Scientificbeekeeping.com does a fairly thorough comparison on various pollen subs that may give some understanding of importance of various characteristics like protein content, total calories, palatability etc. If pollen source is the controlling factor in colony growth, then even a lesser statistically supreme pollen will have a large affect.

Perhaps it is a bit like the questionable benefit of feeding caviar to pigs if they are getting their fill of good garbage. I am ordering in some Feed Bee brand sub; though it is far from the most prestigious brand.

Willow is one of our first natural pollens available in spring. Supposedly far superior to the good old dandelion stuff but dandelion is when things start to happen!
 

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Thanks Frank and Jack. If I was in the country it would be easier to determine what the pollens are from. It could be seen in the wild or the ag fields. In town it is near impossible, at least for me, unless I see bees actually foraging a species. Right now I strongly suspect that a lot of pollen is coming from the ornamental Crepe Myrtle. Most of the pollen I see coming in is snow white now. I find it fascinating but frustrating when I don't know if they are bringing in "junk" pollen. I'll keep reading.

I appreciate you both responding.
 

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I believe I have seen a website which shows slides of microscope views of different pollens. They are quite unique in shape, color and surface detail. Somewhat similar to the unique Covid19 virus appearance. There are quite cheap USB microscope cameras with plenty of magnification that would work for you.

Unique Pollen identification used to be the standard for determining the geographic source of honeys but the superfine filtering was a way to get around that scrutiny. The new state of the art method uses nuclear technology to define plant source.
 

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BTW - pollen doesn't only contain protein - there are also a whole array of trace elements which are just as vital to bees' health. Like most things, there are sources of info re: this on The Web if you search for it.

FWIW - pollen grains have two coats, at least one of which is made largely from Pectin (digging deep into the ol' memory now ...) which is claimed by some Internet sources to be toxic to bees. Perhaps somebody should tell them that eating pollen isn't good for them LOL :)
LJ
 
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