Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm moving off campus next year into a house with some friends that are interested in beekeeping. Has anyone ever built a plexiglass coffee table that could hive bees in it (with a tube out a window)? If so, do you have any pictures or plans of it.

I think it would be quite the conversation starter...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,532 Posts
If you are doing this for a conversation piece it is not neccassary to get into it frequently for management purpose. They will become overpopulated and swarm but let them. You got them there to look at right? Watch all the swarming they will do plus all their usual activities. Make sure to have enough screened ventilation for them though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
this may be of the wall but ,,, would air conditioing cause the hive to act like one that is in the shade ,, you know ,, cool , little or no sun ,, little brood ???????
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
That's a seriously cool idea. You'd be looking at the tops of the combs instead of the cells, but you'd see bees for sure. Also it it's used much (setting down remotes, coffee cups etc.) be aware the bees react to vibration and will be a little more on alert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
I'm moving off campus next year into a house with some friends that are interested in beekeeping. Has anyone ever built a plexiglass coffee table that could hive bees in it (with a tube out a window)? If so, do you have any pictures or plans of it.

I think it would be quite the conversation starter...
Assuming your location and your reference to campus, I'm wondering if you know Dr. Rick Fell in the entomology department at Va Tech. He might have some ideas. Fantastic person, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
I would think that a regular observation hive would be a better solution. As a conversation peice it offers a full view of a colony - the queen, workers, drones, uncapped and capped larva, and honey. Whereas with a coffee table type hive with plexiglass, you will get most only views of workers moving around. Management of the regular observation hive would also be a lot simpler.

As mentioned, contact Dr Fell there at Tech. He and several of his graduate students would most likely provide you some excellent pointers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
At first look, this sounds like fun. But I think there are some buts...

I own a pet store and years ago, a company marketed a coffee table aquarium. In the
pictures they looked great and in thought it seemed like a wonderful conversational peice,
and a "must have" item. We sold a few, and after a gleeful set up and beginning, nobody
was happy with them. The view was not as clear as a stand up aquarium, the top scratched when used as a coffee table gets used, the fish were always stressed due to
coffee table use, the aquarium was way harder to service that standard aquariums, and it wasn't too long that the few we sold were shut down and abandoned.

I would think it through thoroughly before doing it. Weigh the pros and cons, and then
act accordingly.

Best wishes.
Laurence
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top