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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I am thinking of building a hive stand on here im thinking of holding 4 hives. If every one could please post their pictures of what they have got or made id greatly appreciate it. I can weld or make it out of wood money and materials isn't a problem really. cant wait to see what shows up
 

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here are my stands. i really like them and they were really cheap. i go to home depot and scope out the culled lumber bin all the time. on many ocasions i will find a 16 foot weather treated 2x6 where only the very end is warped. everything in the cull bin is 70% off. the legs came from a deck that i tore down for a neighbor last year. all in all the stand cost me $7. the posts sit on brick pavers that were laying around the house.

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and heres is a stand that is not in use

http://i1225.photobucket.com/albums/ee381/dputt88/20140722_075659_zpsreniv3dg.jpg
 

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Here are some of my stands. For my brood stock, I put 3 hives on the 12 footers and 4 hives on the 16 footers. Leaves room between the hives to sit supers or brood boxes when you are working them. They are made from 2 inch used well casing.

Stovall Brood Stock.jpg


2012 nucs.jpg

Nucs are placed on blue, plastic, tubs that are free from area farmers. They get mineral feed in them. They are strong enough for a deep and a super, but, would not be strong enough for a double hive with supers on it. They are free.
2012 5 & 10 frame nucs.jpg


cchoganjr
 

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They not the prettiest thing as they are made out of scrap that I had laying around, but they are sturdy and functional. I spaced the two inside cross pieces so that frames could be set between them during inspections.

Hive stand 1.jpg

Hive stand 2.jpg
 

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Mine are a variation on the Charlie B. ant-resistant stands. I use U pipe supports instead of T supports. The white cups have grease in them to block ants.

If you go this way, the pipe ends should go to below the frost line and rest on a stone or concrete block, or be set in concrete, so they don't sink deeper in the ground.

FortBee002Compr.jpg
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FortBee013Compr.jpg
 

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I use 2x6's and concrete blocks. I have also used landscaping timbers in place of the 2x6's, and the timbers seem less apt to warp and sag.

b9.jpg
 

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Used pressure treated 4X4's on asphalt.

 

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I don't have a pic handy but, it's hard to beat two concrete blocks and two 4x4s. you can put four hives on it by using a 8ft 4x4s. They are quick, easy, relatively cheap, and easy to move if needed and will last for years.
 

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Hives.jpg

Here are our hive stands. The wood is 2x10 for the most part. We live at just under 7700' elevation and don't have a problem with ants, but do have bears, hence the electric fencing. While a single stand for four hives is easier to build, separate stands allow for easier access around each hive while working, moving boxes, etc. I used the black concrete blocks simply because I had a bunch of them left over from another project so they were free and will now support a hive with several thousand pounds of honey. :eek:
 

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Mine are a variation on the Charlie B. ant-resistant stands. The white cups have grease in them to block ants. set in concrete so they don't sink deeper in the ground.
I dont have a picture of mine either but very similar to what is shown here. I made out of 4x4 and 2x4 green wood and I have an oil pan underneath for blocking the ants. Also set into the ground with cement but I have added two big 3" eyelets into the cement to be able to lock up the hives if need be. I also set the frames 18 3/8" apart to hold a frame if working that stand.

@Phobee....I really like that PVC barrier you have......wished I'd have thought of that b4 using the oil pan.
 

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Santa, credit BeeSource member Charlie B. for that. He's been widely imitated. I actually found an example on YouTube before I found it here. Mine are slightly different, split so they can be removed for cleaning and re-greasing. The grade of grease matters ... some formulations are too runny. Mine have EP moly grease in them because I had it on hand, but I think the word was you need a proper axel grease.

It works, except if you leave a cable or rope dangling from the platform, or blades of grass, etc., the ants take the bypass.

I'm using the same strategy on hummingbird feeders. We have some Ant Can'ts that you're supposed to put water and detergent in, but if you invert them and use grease, they don't need refilling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
this is to the people who use the 2x6's on the 4x4 or 6x6's do you have any problem or worry about them blowing over in a storm? or do you ratchet strap them down???
 

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I think i put my 4x4 in the ground 3", may have used concrete too.
Wednesday the 22nd we had some strong straight line winds, i expected to see my 4 deep hive on the ground but no. my stand by the house, two double nucs lost their outer covers. fortunately my bees make a lot of Propolis.


Gary
 
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