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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just came across an old stash of unused beekeeping equipment. Very lucky find I am thinking, but a lot of the shallow supers and hive bodies are a molded polyurethane. They seem pretty sturdy and well build but I notice Walter Kelly does not carry them anymore. Anybody have any experience or insight on them? Wondering why they are not around anymore and if they would provide good enough insulation to be suitable for use in winter.
 

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MOisture, Moisture and more Moisture. Regardless of maker if you have any plastic inner covers or tops throw them in the garbage....a plastic inner cover will cause it to "rain" on the bees inthe winter time...moisture is the biggest problemin cold weather .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What about supers and hive bodies. Have used plastic on all three of my hives for inner covers and telescoping covers and all three hives have survived winter so far. Have others had the same experience as you?

Any idea why plastic would lead to more moisture problems than propolis and wax covered wood inner covers would? Does the wood absorb that much water to keep it from raining or breathe better or something?
 

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I've got a few of these brood boxes and probably a hundred med's and shallow's. I'm not particularly fond of them, but they seem to work great for me. They have little nubs on the bottom side that help lock the supers into place. There has been some warping problems on the lower corners pulling away from the other pieces. I pounded them back into place, cracking the plastic, but then I secured it with course-threaded deck screws.

I have quite a few Kelley bottoms, and some of them are warping. I have four or five dozen of the plastic inner covers and they'll warp coming out of the box. I used some strips of wood around the edge, held on with course-threaded deck screws to bring them back into "compliance."

I wish I had more of the plastic outer covers. They are practically indestructible.

As for moisture, I can't say that's been a problem with me. I notice that the plastic covers allow warm air up above the inner cover and the moisture condenses on the bottom of the outer cover. Then if it drips, the drips fall back on the inner cover.

And you would be surprised how much moisture those hives can create...and it doesn't have to be that cold.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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I also use them for trays in my honey house to catch honey while the supers are stacked awaiting extracting.
This is what I use my plastic Kelley t-covers for. I don't put them on hives any longer. They actually sit on a ridge that allows for ventilation. Unfortunately that gap is big enough for bees to get through. I put my supers on bee escapes to harvest. I lost a load of honey to robbing because of those covers.
 
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