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I, too, am interested in the responses. I have one myself that I have never used.
 

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I bought and use a dozen of the plastic ones, but I prefer my old ones, that have lasted for decades, they are the ones with wire and wooden frames but I just can't afford more of them right now.

In defense, the plastic ones do work, but I know that I must always remember to keep them out of direct sunlight and to manipulate them with a gentle hand, to avoid breaking them. They are also priced so that replacing them is not a major drain on my wallet.
 

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Had good results after switching from steel framed to plastic excluders. No issues with durability in the plastic although they are thicker (~3mm) than other plastic excluders I've seen. A downside to plastic is that you can put steel excluders in a parafin dipper to clean them up and this isn't an option with plastic. New plastic excluders can also be quite slippery before it gets a bit of propolis on it so hives need to be level.
 

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I think they are junk. Warp out after a couple of years is my experience with them.

Will be sticking to the traditional metal rolled/round type.

I should have known better - you get what you pay for etc etc :)
That was my experience exactly.
 

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When removing supers, the plastic excluders are more difficult to separate from the frames. Because they're light and flexible they don't come away evenly and almost every time I remove one it comes away with a 'flap'...and agitates the daylights out of the bees. By the time I'm finished with the hive, normally calm bees are noticeably more defensive. I quit using them.
 

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As just mentioned - plastic is attached considerably more with burr comb to the frames and is more upsetting to the bees when removed, this indicates that the bee space is not always present as well clear across the top. They are cheaper. However with the metal queen excluder you might have less swarming due to the bee space being more uniform across the tops of the frames. Queen excluders are well known as honey excluders by many beeks and the plastic may be the worse of the two types. On the other hand, the metal one can sometimes get its wires just a little bent by having been stored carelessly with others - creating an opening just wide enough for the queen. It's hardly noticeable but the queen inevitably finds that wider slot. Best to learn to do without them. OMTCW
 

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They are lighter than wire ones and easir to clean and the holes don't get enlarged like wire one do when the wire gets bent.

They warp and can break after they have been laying around in the sun for a time.

Why do you want to use them? I mostly use excluders when I am making splits and nucs or if i have brood in a honey super and i want the brood to hatch out before i take it off. But i don't do much of that either, usually I will put that brood one another hive above some honey.
 

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I use both types and had no problem. I do prefer the wire ones but the new, heavy plastic types are smooth and easy to clean ( put in the freezer for a couple of hours and bend)
I clean both types very regularly so that the bees can move freely up and down.
 

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sqkcrk,
How are you cleaning your plastic excluders? Is it something you do in the field or are the brought back to workshop in the off season?
 

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I've yet to find anyone that likes them.
 

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How are you cleaning your plastic excluders? Is it something you do in the field or are the brought back to workshop in the off season?

Wait until winter when it is really cold and flex the plastic excluders. The propolis and burr comb shatters into little pieces.

Or stick them in the freezer to get the comb and propolis brittle.
 

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sqkcrk,
How are you cleaning your plastic excluders? Is it something you do in the field or are the brought back to workshop in the off season?
My " field" is very close to my home and I deal with only 12 hives...I put the plastic excluders in a large plastic bag which I place in the freezer for a couple of hours. After you can bend them gently and most of the wax and rubbish blisters off. Very easy.
 

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I have used them for years and have not had any problems with them. If the metal ones were cheaper, I would probably use them. The manufactures of trhe metal ones will admit that the machines that weld the wire together, will get off occasionally, and allow the spacing to get off, which results in letting the queen get through. The plastic ones are consistent. As far as damaging thier wings, I have never seen evidence of that. It seems that there would be a lot of dead bees that can't fly, on the ground in front of the hive, and the honey production would be down. I have seen neither.
 
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