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I fellow told me a method of extracting honey manually. He said to scrape the capped comb and put the frame in a 5 gal plastic pail at an angle with a block on the bottom of the frame and let the honey drip out. Has anyone done this type of extracting? Does anyone have any other details to add? It takes longer as it is not instant as a extractor.
 

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"It takes longer as it is not instant ..."
and you wont get nearly as much honey, and you will measure the time in days, not minutes. better to contact your local bee club or co. ag agent and try and borrow one, perhaps after you help the owner extract...
good luck,mike
 

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Also of concern with that method, is prolonged exposure to humidity and getting your honey wet. Your moisture content can increase quickly on the hot and humid days we've been having recently.
 

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Try the crush and strain method. Simple, cheap, and effective. Google "crush and strain" on youtube, and check out Michael Bush's site for a howto.
 

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What is the yield % doing crush and strain compared to using an extractor? I have access to an extractor through the local bee club but I was just wondering.
I would say that it doesn't matter what the yield of crushing is when you have access to the extractor, think of it more in the form of "if you don't have to destroy the foundation, the bees will be that much farther along the next time you use that frame." Whether it is this season or next, it is said that it takes 7 lbs to 8 lbs of honey to make one pound of wax. So there is loss of honey right from the gate, plus the time lost building the new foundation.

C2
 

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WVA...I agree with Batman, I would say the yield difference is quite small. The gain is in having drawn comb for the next go round. Of course on the flip side is the cost of the equipment to extract (you can crush and strain with stuff you already have in the kitchen) and the storing of drawn comb overwinter in such a way as to keep it wax moth free. SO like with everything else in beeking, that is one more choice you have to make...:) Here is what I would suggest to a first time harvester, If you can locate an extractor to borrow or rent get it but also do a super of crush and strain. This way you will have experienced both and based on your experience you can decide what is best for you before making a large capital layout.

P.S. How is Momma and the baby doing??
 

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Mom and babe are doing great. Thanks for asking :D

I was asking more out of curiosity but also just in case next year when I have bees and if I am lucky enough to get some honey...if I am only able to extract a handful of frames I would have to decide if it is worth driving 1.5hr to where the extractor is located or if I would get close to the same yield by crushing and straining. I hope that in a few years I can sell off enough product to be able to purchase a small extractor for my house but that is looking down the road a little ways. But thanks for the input...I appreciate it.
 
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