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I was given a plastic gallon feeding jar that I'd like to use in the spring. Seems like I'd be able to monitor consumption without opening the hive, with less worry about robbing, drowning bees, or attracting ants.

The lid that came with the jar has nine 1/16" holes drilled. Does that sound like the right size and quantity? I tried it out with water, and it worked out once a balance between vacuum and volume of water was reached, but I'm concerned that with the heavier syrup, the holes might not be big enough.

Now that I'm already invested into this set up by buying more jars and making top covers with holes, I'd thought I'd ask if anyone out there has gone this route, and/or has advice. Let me know what you think! Thanks
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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1/16" holes ought to be plenty large. The holes in my mason jar feeders are made with the staples from my staple gun. They are much smaller than 1/16".
 

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I was given a plastic gallon feeding jar that I'd like to use in the spring. Seems like I'd be able to monitor consumption without opening the hive, with less worry about robbing, drowning bees, or attracting ants.

The lid that came with the jar has nine 1/16" holes drilled. Does that sound like the right size and quantity? I tried it out with water, and it worked out once a balance between vacuum and volume of water was reached, but I'm concerned that with the heavier syrup, the holes might not be big enough.

Now that I'm already invested into this set up by buying more jars and making top covers with holes, I'd thought I'd ask if anyone out there has gone this route, and/or has advice. Let me know what you think! Thanks
An issue you may run into with this plastic jars is that they do NOT do well if exposed to sunlight for long periods. They are also too tall to fit under a deep box with the telescoping cover on. I have tried a number of feeding containers and found that the 1 gallon buckets & lids with feeder screen that Brushy Mountain used to sell work fantastic. They fit under a deep box with the telescoping cover on, the lid uses a molded lip to seal onto the bucket The removes VERY easy with the hive tool instead of a rubber seal that fosters mold and eventually leaks as well as the lugs on the lid crack.

Blue Sky Bee Supply sells these bucket feeders

Pail Feeder [664]

Unfortunately these bucket feeders are on the pricey side so for a few this may be acceptable but I buy them in bulk by the case and punch the holes & melt the screen into the lids my self for about half that price. Probably not very practical for beekeepers that don't have many hives. To my knowledge, these bucket feeders come only in the 1 gallon size. (they actually hold 1.25 gallons)

For a larger bucket feeder that will fit under a deep box and telescoping cover, Better Bee has a 2 gallon pail feeder (it holds a little more than 2 gallons).

2 Gal Feeder Pail & Lid

The nice thing about the 1 gallon bucket feeders is that they leave enough overhead room for me to place a 1 1/2 sheet of polyiso foam insulation board over the top inside the empty brood box and they cover with the telescoping cover. This insulates the area where the syrup buckets sets and helps a great deal to retain heat under the inner cover. Here is Tennessee it allows me to feed syrup the entire Winter if I need/choose to.

When done using the buckets, a good washing and they stack up nicely without taking up a lot of storage space.
 
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