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I bought some plastic frames and did not realize that they are hard to introduce to the hive. Does anyone have any successful tips on how to get the ladies to use them? I was thinking of putting them in #3 and #7 between drawn comb. Thanks
 

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That's what I usually do with them. Between frames of capped "brood" is best. It's not quite as hard as it's made out to be sometimes. A lot has to do with the time of year.

If you are in a flow and the bees are actively drawing comb right now it should go pretty smoothly. The problems I've had with the bees ignoring the plastic frames is usually during non-peak periods of wax making.
 

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I've had no problems with them used as Mike suggests.
 

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If you have some clean beeswax, you could add some to the face of the frames. I have also read that spraying the frame with syrup will help, but I've never done that.

Enj.
 

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First year beekeeper here - I read some 'bad reviews' of plastic foundation, but honestly, have to wonder if that's not just a little bit of 'traditionalist bias'. I painted on some melted beeswax to give the bees a head start, and in both of my hives they've almost fully drawn out 2 brood boxes worth of frames. I think adding the bees wax (even if your plastic comes pre-coated) is the trick.
 

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To draw good comb you need a strong population of young bees. If your colony is not strong, only give it one frame at a time to be drawn. If you have 5 frame nuc boxes use those to house the bees drawing comb. They draw comb faster and better in the second story of a weak double 5 frame nuc configuration than in a weak standard 10 frame box.
 

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it takes the bees a little bit longer to get started drawing plastic frames [up to a couple weeks]. for some reason often they go to wood frames with plastic foundation quicker than all plastic. all is fine though. as suggested more wax or some syrup spray helps. this also seems to vary a lot hive to hive. if you only have 1 or 2 hives this could be frustrating.
 

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I think this thread is about plastic frames, not foundation. I gave up on my plastic frames this year. I only had 10 but they never seemed to work no matter what I did they eventually quit laying in them. Might have been something I did but why take the chance. wood frames are better for sure.
 

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I think this thread is about plastic frames, not foundation. I gave up on my plastic frames this year. I only had 10 but they never seemed to work no matter what I did they eventually quit laying in them. Might have been something I did but why take the chance. wood frames are better for sure.
Don't all plastic frames have plastic foundation?
 

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Our two nucs have finally started drawing comb on their deep wax foundation in the deeps. We've been collecting bridge and burr comb as we tidy up the hives, and I've melted some of that down. It is brown and has a distinct smell that I suspect may be more effective than State-Fair-grade pretty stuff.

I was thinking I'd use that both on the plastic foundation for the medium honey supers and maybe at the tops of the deep frames just to make them smell right.

Are there any problems using melted wax on wax foundation? Just a little on the wood adjacent to the foundation maybe?

Does plastic foundation need it all over or just a little at the top to get them started?
 

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Do you have small hive beetles? One word of caution...unless they changed the design, plastic frames most often are not solid, leaving an absolute perfect hiding place for small hive beetles on the end bars which the bees can not defend. All wood, all the way....JMO.
 
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