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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was wondering if anybody has any reviews on using the plastic escape disks that go over the inner cover hole and can be used as a bee escape.
I like the idea of not having to store extra equipment and having bee escape boards for every hive stored all year long just dosnt make sense to me. I can store many of these disks in a tote and just put them on the inner cover and put under supers when I’m ready to harvest.
Another thing it does too is keeps me from forgetting to close the upper entrance in the inner cover.
If bee escape is on and inner cover is on top it leaves a access hole to robbers and no bees in the supers to guard.
 

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I use them all year on nuc's.
I also have them on All swarm traps.
I started printing them last year with left over filament for my 3D printer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I use them all year on nuc's.
I also have them on All swarm traps.
I started printing them last year with left over filament for my 3D printer.
You are referring to the entrance disks to reduce the entrance sizes.
I’m asking about the bee escape disks that are used at harvest time to get bees out of honey supers.
E58C9FF1-09E7-452C-A656-8D0B8AD4B4FA.jpg
 

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tried them many many years ago, #1 they don't let bees out fast enough, especially if it's really hot, #2 if you have any drones in the honey supers, they seem to always get stuck and clog it up. Try one of the triangle escape boards they work better and faster with less chance of plugging up.
 

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A picture in the first thread would have been nice.
No I don't us them, I don't have time working by my self with 80+ hives.
I use fume boards,a lot faster.
 

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What you are talking about is called a porter bee escape. There are oval ones for inner cover oval holes and round ones for inner cover round holes.

Triangle escape boards are super easy to make. Use a piece of 1/2 or 3/4 plywood and staple 3/4" rims to it and a triangle. They don't take up any extra storage space since they go right in my stack of stored supers. As a small scale beekeeper with a small extractor I can't extract any faster than the triangle escapes will clear the supers so one escape board is working just fine for less than ten hives.

If remembering to close the upper entrance is a problem then put the inner cover below the triangle escape board. Because that is exactly the same place that you will be putting it in the stack if you use a with a porter escape. I'd rather remember to close my upper entrance, because that way I still have the inner cover to keep the top from sticking down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have no idea why they call it Quebec style. But don’t think green wood is used. The two I ordered are just like any other wooden ware. Plywood top with pine.
 

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I use quebec style and they style you provided a picture of. I don't find a big difference between the two styles, but the quebec style work maybe slightly better. We use them on the early pull Mid July to Mid August then blow out the last supers in September
 
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