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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, does anyone know where to find plans for making a bee escape. It looks pretty simple, but I've learned that fractions of an inch in beekeeping can make all the difference. And are there different kinds and what are the advantages of each.
Thanks!
J.P.Rich
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Discussion Starter #3
Then it would make sence to make a double one, take off a med super, put a piece of plywood on top of it. Set it away from the hive, on the escape, and come back the next day or at least several hours later and it should be bee free. Seems too easy, what am I missing?
Thanks!
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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It's never bee free. And it takes at least overnight. Here's my advice.

Using bee escapes.

There are several kinds of bee escapes. My favorite, and the only one I had much luck with, is the double triangular bee escapes mentioned above. Basically, it’s a one way door. They are easy enough to make yourself. You can buy them from Brushy Mt. Bee Farm. If you want you can buy one and use it for a pattern. The escape is put under the supers and then you wait a couple of days for he bees to move down into the hive. You may do this with less lifting by setting a bottom board behind the hive, putting the bee escape on that and restacking the supers off onto the escape and put a beeproof lid on. That way you don’t have to restack them back on the hive after adding the escape. When you open up the supers the next day 95% of the bees should have left. The main cause of failure for this is when you have even a tiny amount of brood in one of the supers. And, of course, if you put the escape on upside down it will have the opposite effect. Now brush or blow the remaining bees off one frame at a time and do it twice. Then stack the empty frames in an empty box with a bee tight bottom board and bee tight lid that you replace after every frame. Try to get all the bees. You won’t succeed but try anyway. It may save your marriage when you’re processing them in the kitchen.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The escapes look easy enough to make. Is there any preferences on the screen to use, can I just use regular window screen? I like the idea of cutting down on the lifting too.
Thanks again for the help... Where's that 'Book' I heard you were writing, I know, most of it is online on this forum.
J.P.Rich

PS, I'm a single parent with a daughter and all her animals... no problem with the bees in the house, her English Setter eats them, well 'slimes' them pretty good then eats them. If I'd known that's how to get rid of a wife... I would have started with the bees MUCH sooner!
 

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For the screen you will want to use #8 mesh hardware cloth. You should be able to find some at a local hardware shop.
 

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What exactly are all these bee escapes used for...taking honey off?

Just curious

burt
 

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I took a couple of pictures available here that show my first attempt at a vortex style escape board. I had only used those porter bee escapes in the past, but these vortex boards are really nice. I was able to clear out 2 supers in about 3-4 hours. Obviously times will vary.

I think everyone should consider using fume boards as well if time is of the essence. A number of people around here have begun modifing their fume board to include small electronic motors/fans with on/off switches to really get the bees out quick with bee go or bee quick. It seems to work really well, but I choose not to do that because of the smell and the close proximity to my apiary.
 

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"You may do this with less lifting by setting a bottom board behind the hive, putting the bee escape on that and restacking the supers off onto the escape and put a beeproof lid on. That way you don’t have to restack them back on the hive after adding the escape. "

Thanks for another great idea, Michael. Now I'll only have to lift the heavy honey supers off the tall hives once!

Mark
 
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