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I am thinking of placing a swarm trap and trying it this year. It seems like from what people have been saying, placing them in trees is the best.

Now... excuse me for this stupid question. Remember.. I am a chef. Give me a fish and I can cook it.

Give me a nuc to put in a tree and I ask you for the fish!! he he lol

Seriously, how do you put a nuc up in a tree? I would like to use a rope becausem kaing stands that fit in trees is not my trade.

any help or advice?
 

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Chef, I just made 6 traps today, light boxes to fit over a regular deep. I also cut 2x4, 4 pieces/trap at 30 deg. and screw them on a piece of plywood 2 on the top and 2 on the bottom to form 2 “V” of 120 deg. I used a string to temporary gold the plywood to the side of the box for “assembly/tie-up” purpose. Then I used a ratchet tie-down (5 for $10) to lock the box-plywood assembly to the tree. It’s the first time I am doing this and since I’ve heard that it may be difficult to take it down, I also looped a string from 2 bolts on the box over the branch above the box, thinking that if I have to struggle with the ratchet tie-down, the box will hang on that string until I get my hands free to hold the box, at which time I can just cut the string. It worked pretty well on a 6” dia. tree as well as one that’s 2 feet in diameter. If you give me your e-mail I can take some pictures tomorrow and forward them to you.
 

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Chef, I've had good luck putting them in deer hunting stands. Perfect height (usally 15-20 feet up) and easy access. Last year I used an old piece of farm machinery for one. Only could get it up to 7-8 feet but the bees still liked it. Good luck
 

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Me tooo....crapes and French fries, first because I enjoy flipping them over, second because I enjoy pilling them off and slicing them. I sent you a couple pics and I'll take 2 more tomorrow of the ones in the trees.
 

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I tied my nuc to a tree about 8 ft up at a place where I could set the 5 frame nuc on a horizontal branch. Then, using one piece of ~15 ft of rope, I wound the rope around the nuc to the horiz limb then wound the rope around the nuc to the trunk of the tree. Very sturdy. No bees yet, still hoping for a lunker swarm. Getting the nuc down from the tree if it is full of bees may be a tad more difficult!
 

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http://www.feralhoneybees.homestead.com/Methods.html

Try this link (cut and paste, if it doesn't work to click on it), it has some of my pictures of swarm traps that I like, and one that I detest.

If you want to hang a nuc box, cut a 1x4" board about 20" long. Drill a 1" hole about two inches from one end of this board. Using sheet rock screws 1-5/8" long, screw the board to the side of the nuc box, in the middle to balance. Make sure the hole is exposed to hang on a nail. You should have about half of the board on the side of the nuc box and half sticking up above it.

Your nuc box tops have to be flush with the sides. I use a piece of 1/4" plywood screwed down to the top of the nuc box with 1-1/8" sheet rock screws and my cordless electric drill.

I use 6" nails, really stout, and pound them into a tree. I'm not sure what the long term effect is on the tree, however.

For some of my other designs, I built a light-weight shelf. The light-weight nuc box is secured with twine. There are more pictures on the above link. Keep following the "next" link. Maybe there is something of value to get your creative juices going.

And as always, be safe when climbing ladders. If you don't like ladders, hang the trap at eye level. This height will still work, but I think higher up is better.

Also, FWIT, pheromone lures make the trap more efficient.

Hope this helps,

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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I am toying with the idea this year of putting up a couple of swarm traps. The previous owners of my house left two 9 ft posts sunk in old tires with concrete that I guess they used as mobile volley ball posts. I was thinking of placing a trap on top of each one because it would be easy to just tip them down to ground level to retrieve swarms. I plan on placing them about 300 yards away from my hives, but I was wondering if they should be placed in the shade of a tree. I remember reading somewhere that swarm traps in sun don't work as well. Any suggestions?
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Since they work better up in the air, it's easiest to put them IN a tree. This is pretty naturally what the bees are looking for. I don't think it matters otherwise. I've had bees move into hives that were on the ground in the sun.
 

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My bees are non-conformists. I'm forever finding them within 50 feet of the hive. I found one last night formed up on a tomato cage, two feet off the ground and thirty feet from the hives. Last year I found seven swarms less that twenty feet from the hive stands. My bees ignore all swarm traps. I've used full hive bodies on stands and in trees, nucs in trees, the recycled cardboard flower pot looking traps.....some with swarm lures, some without, some with Lemon Pledge. Most swarms I've reclaimed in my yard were 7-20 feet above the ground.
 

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I have been told that if you remove the queen cells and give the bees room to move..ie.. 2 brood boxes..that they are less likely to swarm..
 

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>I have been told that if you remove the queen cells and give the bees room to move..ie.. 2 brood boxes..that they are less likely to swarm..

Giving the brood nest room before they build queen cells is very effective. Removing queen cells is not effective in my experiece. Once they've built cells I have to split them or they swarm.
 

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I have heard removing the queen cells is only good if you remove them before they are sealed with a larvae inside. Waiting until they are sealed does not stifle the swarm impulse as the workers believe a queen will leave with them as they have completed the task of initiating a new queen.
 
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