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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are hoping to start between 4-10 hives next spring. We live in a neighborhood, and state law only allows us to have 4 hives on our 1/2 acre. A friend who lives about a mile away told us we could put hives at his farm, and so did our neighbor across the street. Has anyone done this before, or know of any potential liability issues/problems? :scratch:
 

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It is not uncommon to keep hives on somebody else's property. Matter of fact all of my hives are on other people's farm's. I did keep some hives in an empty field (small field of 1 1/2 acres) and the homeowner said that when ever he tried to cut grass he would get stung a few times and asked that I move them. Moving them was good with me since I found a better place to move those hives. I actually already had the new location in mind and that just gave me the reason to move them there. I have no experience with hives in a neighborhood although I did sell a hive to a man that keeps them on his balcony in downtown Richmond, VA. He hasn't ever had any problems. You might want to consider talking to your neighbors on each side of you and maybe offer them a jar of honey. Maybe a wood fence to keep them behind and out of sight might be good too. Just my two cents worth.
Big T
 

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Do a search for this topic on BeeSource. It has been discussed countless times, from suggested contract paperwork to general questions. No need to rehash it all unless your particular questions aren't answered by the search results. Best luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sorry - not trying to rehash what's already been discussed! Search results didn't show me what I was looking for, but I'll try again. :(
 

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Don't worry. If only different questions were allowed on a forum after about a year the forum would simply stop accepting questions and be a called a book.

What you are talking about in normal. In my opinion there is always a chance of getting sued for something, even if they say they won't. I would try to put the hives somewhere on the property that is remote to the living areas and still accessible. Farms will of course be easier to work with since farmers are used to having dangerous animals around (cows, horses, etc. are not as tame and safe as many believe). A farm will usually have plenty of space away from the living areas.

You can offer them honey for the use of the property (most say a pound per colony) but you can do what you is best for the situation of course.

You can make papers up to sign but really they probably aren't much use.
I would only deal with people you believe are honest and are to be trusted. Also someone here mentioned a very good idea - ask every now an then if the bees are causing any problems or if they would like you to adjust some way you are using the property.

Hope it works out for you,
Mike
 

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What state law are you referring to jannaMI? You should familiarize yourself with the Michigan Right to Farm Act. It gives comprehensive protection to Michigan farmers. And guess what? Under the Act, if you engage in agricultural practices and make a profit or ATTEMPT to make a profit then you qualify as a farmer. By the way, with the exception of HOA's it trumps all local ordinances.
 

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We are hoping to start between 4-10 hives next spring. We live in a neighborhood, and state law only allows us to have 4 hives on our 1/2 acre. A friend who lives about a mile away told us we could put hives at his farm, and so did our neighbor across the street. Has anyone done this before, or know of any potential liability issues/problems? :scratch:
There is NO state law restricting the number of hives. There is "Recommend density of honey bee colonies reletive to lot size"

This is found under Michigans "GENERALLY ACCEPTED AGRICULTURAL AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR BEEKEEPING AND APIARY MANAGEMENT" These are NOT laws.

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MDA_Care_Farm_Animals_GAAMP_129713_7.pdf

Pages 78-89
 

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Compliance with the GAAMPS can HELP in a lawsuit, however. (Note that I said HELP.) People can sue for ANY reason. Whether they win or not is a different story. GAAMPS helps complaining neighbors to NOT win.

DBest is right. There is no state LAW restricting the number of hives you may have on your property.

DS
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for directing me to the correct documents. I read something that was posted on the MI beekeepers association site (I think it was the GAAMPS form) that said you were only supposed to have 4 per 1/2 acre site. I didn't realize it was only a suggestion! However, we are in a neighborhood with a fairly rigid set of association rules, and we have a president who is a bit of a jerk, so we try to just not rock the boat. We've mentioned the idea to the neighbors on each side of us, and they were fine with it, but we have some other reservations as well. Thankfully, the people who own the two acres across the street from us are not a part of the neighborhood, and there is no house on the property, only a barn. The other friend who owns a farm has a spot at the back of a field where we can put them also. We're a little hesitant to keep them at our house due to our extremely curious and fearless 5 year old. She loves animals, bugs, etc, and seems to have no sense of danger. We actually have four kids 6 and under, and I would feel better about letting them play outside if I'm not having to worry about them bothering the bees, since we'd have to put the hives right where they play. Thanks for helping! We're very new to all of this, and really excited to get started! :)
 
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