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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a hive that was queenless, so I take a medium depth frame of eggs and larvae out of one of my other hives, and I put it into the queenless hive so they can raise their own queen. That was a week ago, today I go back and check to see if they have queen cells, just to make sure that they were indeed queenless, and I find 13 cells, all but a couple were capped. What was odd to me is that all 13 cells were located right at the bottom edge of the comb on the medium frame, just as if they were swarm cells. The frame is full both sides with capped worker brood. I don't believe I have ever seen emergency cells on the bottom edge of the comb before, has anyone else seen this? John
 

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Yes, we see it often on splits. For some odd reason queens go back to a frame of older or capped brood and lay eggs around the perimeter of the older brood even when there are empty frames available. So we get cells built on the bottom or sides, even along the top bar. Often, when choosing a frame of brood for grafting we'll find the youngest larva on a frame of capped brood. :scratch:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
fish stix,

Maybe the queens do that on splits to keep the brood more condensed so its easier for a smaller group of bees to care for, instead of spreading out the brood too much, just an idea. John
 
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