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So was doing a hurried inspection of my hive this Sunday, trying to get all the bars accounted for before the rain clouds would hit (and sadly they didn't). I noticed on one of my hive the comb had some pimples, actually probably drone cells. Was interesting to see how distended the capped cells looked, honestly like a big old zit that needed some popping. Wish I had my camera at the time to get some pics.

Anyways, here is my question in regards to that: How much drone is too much drone?

I think in all that hive had maybe a handful (~5) capped drone cells on two bars. These are package bees installed on May 7th, one hive is building lots of comb on the south side of the hive but she is laying very regular, while the other is building evenly on the bars but her laying ( and their pollen storing) is a bit less regular. This irregular queen is the one with a few drone cells. At what point does drone cells become an issue?
 

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dont worry about the drone cells unless all of the brood is drone cells. then you have a laying worker. i have a hive with at least 100 drone cell right now. but this hive also has about 11 frames of brood/ eggs also. some hives put out more drones it seems like than others. it is natural so dont worry about it.
 

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I depends on the time of year. For me in early spring (March) I see 100% worker brood. Swarm season (April-June) 10% drone brood isn't uncommon. Later in the summer/fall you should find less drone brood as the workers will start actively removing the drones.
 

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Assuming your hive is queen right and there are no laying workers - why would a human know better than the bee's on this matter? I'd trust the bee's - they've been doing this for millions of years.
 

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Assuming your hive is queen right and there are no laying workers - why would a human know better than the bee's on this matter? I'd trust the bee's - they've been doing this for millions of years.
Its always good to know what is normal and why for each season so that you can see changes or differences that might require human intervention, comb renewal is a human intervention, bees usually use a cavity until the comb becomes unsuitably dark then they move on, wax moths (and other critters) then destroy this dark comb and make the cavity usable again for more bees. But we can keep a cavity usable and healthy for our bees by moving out old comb. There isn't anything wrong with drone cells, its part of the reproductive function of the colony.
 
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