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I stopped feeding my new nucs around may 15th, my bees seemed to lose interest in the syrup after the first two weeks I fed them. They've been doing fine on pollen and nectar since then, building up nicely into their 2nd deeps now, and their population growing. We've had some rainy days, but I'm not feeding them sugar syrup since that first 2 weeks. Of course, they were 5 frame nucs, so that helped I'm sure.
 

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Yes i have seen the big change! My bees was eatting a quart every 3-5 days and these last few days i have seen them suck that down a quart in just one night...Thats a big change!!!...And whats the ratio in the fall feeding...2:1 ratio???...WOW i better go buy a truck load of sugar now!!...HAHAHA
 

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Same here in WNY. Mine went from taking a quart every 3 days to a quart every day. I have also seen a significant increase in brood and wax building to accomadate the laying space needed by the queen and to ripen nectar!
 

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Are there any months of the year that you guys don't feed sugar?
Personally, I wouldn't want to go into summer with a bunch of sugar syrup packed away in the combs.
Isn't there nectar and pollen available in mid June? Or am I just cluelessly missing something here?
 

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If you have supers on your hives, DON'T FEED! They will store the feed in the supers, Personally I don't want sugar water mixed in my honey and I don't think your customers would either. Feeding is for Build up and to give them a boost, if pollen and nectar is available don't feed any more. My $.o2 cents worth. Dale
 

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Why are you people feeding this time of the year. In my 8-9 years of beekeeping I've probably fed 2 to 3 gallons syrup total. That was to get a split or a package going. I'm sure thats less than most, but once May rolls along there is plenty of pollen and nectar out there to keep them busy. My opinion only but I don't believe it's necessary. You want them to make honey not to package sugar water.
 

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Usually you feed until they draw out the nest (all brood chambers). Stop when you put the supers on. Strangely there was a discussion going in comerc. beekkpr. about honey producers feeding during nectar flows - I guess that store honey may not always be so pure :waiting:

Established hives should only need feeding if your having a lot of bad weather.

Last year we had almost nothing but rainy/cold weather till august. Fed the whole time and when it warmed up and stopped raining (august) they swarmed :D

Mike
 

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Hi Kathy,

My restricted feeder would help reduce the syrup intake while still keeping the bees stimulated.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=241619&highlight=Restricted

I'm glad you have some good bee-news to share. It was rough going for a while...
Like the design. I think I'll try something like that...tired of trips to feed...but the brood chambers are getting there so this is almost over!

...and yeah...its good to finally see things buzzing along better, all the laying worker problems hopefully behind me!
 

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mine are going through a half gallon a day
I just posted yesterday about them going through a half gallon every two days and I just checked and the half gallon jars I added yesterday are empty! Makes me wonder if they are using the jars for their water supply instead of going to the creek!
 

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I've been told by several older bees in my area to feed new hives until a) they lose interest or b) you put the first super on. As they obviously are still interested, I'm gonna feed away, until that first super goes on.... then they are on their own....
 

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They can really take up the syrup when they are brooding and buiulding. Good.

I don't understand the idea of restricting syrup? If you are using it to build comb restriction would mean slower comb production??

Mike
 

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I tell new beekeepers in SE PA to feed until they have two deeps completely drawn out and then keep an eye on stores. The last few years I have seen heavy hives in early June starve in Mid to late July. Most of my hives are in heavily forested areas, so once the trees are done there isn't much left to work until the golden rod and Aster. However golden rod and aster around here seems to produce more pollen then nectar, and the nectar they do bring in during the fall is eaten more then it is put up as surplus.
 
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