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Greetings

In the past couple of days, several people have referred to me as being a booster of pesticides, a Bayer apologist, anti-natural, and related BS. Frankly, I don't give a hoot what people think of me, but in the interest of fairness and common decency it's best not to lie and distort the truth. I am therefore initiating this thread to discuss the bad effects of pesticides on bees, of which there are many.


The interactions between pesticides [16], mite stresses and diseases including the newly identified Israeli acute paralysis virus [IAPV, 17] are likely contributing factors,
although

no one factor alone is responsible for the dramatic losses of honey bees in general or for CCD specifically
further

Pesticides have been implicated in the declines of other bioindicator speciesincluding the altering of olfactory behavior in western US salmon [19], disrupting signaling required for recruitment of nitrogenfixing bacterial symbionts [20], and causing endocrine disruption, increased disease susceptibility, and potential declines in frogs and other amphibian species through synergistic interactions
Honey bees across North America are extensively exposed to multiple pesticides
Brood nest wax and foundations, beebread and trapped pollen, and adult bees and brood comprising 749 samples contained 118 different pesticides and metabolites, 4894 total residues of which 748 were systemics, and averaged 6.5 detections per sample.

Multiple residues prevailed in the bee, pollen and wax samples, with 2 or more pesticides detected in 92.3% of 749 analyzed (Table 4). Almost half of these samples (49.9%) contained at least one systemic pesticide. The most prevalent triple detections were fluvalinate and coumaphos combined with chlorothalonil (47.2%), chlorpyrifos (41.0%), degradates of amitraz (41.0%), or with one of 43 systemic pesticides (47.9%).
Implications for regulatory policy to minimize pesticide risks for pollinators
The widespread occurrence of multiple residues, some at toxic levels for single compounds, and the lack of any scientific literature on the biological consequences of combinations of pesticides, argues strongly for urgent changes in regulatory policies regarding pesticide registration and monitoring procedures as they relate to pollinator safety.
High Levels of Miticides and Agrochemicals in North American Apiaries: Implications for Honey Bee Health. Christopher A. Mullin, et al

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Public Domain declaration which stipulates that, once placed in the public domain, this work may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose
 

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On a positive note, nowadays if I am in cotton and get spray call for a miticide, I ask the aerial applicator to please make an extra pass over the apiary, preferably while the bees are still flying.
 
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