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With the Permacomb coming available for purchase it makes me very interested in what would be the best use for it. I run all mediums now so Permacomb I assume would be better. What I did last year was stick a frame with a starter strip in the hive and let the bees build the comb. This does take a while and a considerable amount of work mixing and dispensing sugar water, going to costco for more sugar, etc... In my plan it takes one year to get my hive to what I call "fighting weight" 3-4 mediums...then plan on honey production the following year (Hopefully 2010). With the possibilities of Permacomb/Honeysupercell but on a limited budget which are people using it for?
1. Honey supers...adding honey supers quickly so the bees get right to producing honey.
(Cost $50 per hive)

2. Brood comb. I could see using it to get my 5 frame nucs immediately to 2 medium boxes of comb so the queen could go crazy right out of the nuc. Maybe I could get honey production the 1st year.
(Cost $100 per hive)

3. Entire hive. I am assuming the entire hive could be Permacomb/Honeysupercell and when you install a nuc the hive builds up for flow then just fills the supers for harvesting a full crop the 1st year.
(Cost $200 per hive)

Just from a financial stand point the initial outlay of $200 is high but if a 5 frame nuc can produce 60lbs on honey, that I sell for $4-5 a lb that would pay for itself. These are only thoughts going through my head trying to get to the point of 15-20 hives that produce every year.

Please note that I am speaking from ONLY 1 year of experience with 8 hives, so please be kind. I realize my ignorance.
 

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I have had one super with permacomb on my hive for three years. The bees have not touched it. I have experimented several ways but no results.
Janvanhamont
 

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Wow
Some one else that has had the same luck as I did with Permacomb :( lots of people like it but I have 2 supers of it and as above I tried it on several hives over a couple of years and the bees wont store honey in it. Some have tried to buy it from but I keep it to remind my self that it don`t work for every one.
I am going to put a swarm in it one of these years and see if they will stay.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Like most plastic, it works best if the bees have no other options. Once it's being used, it is treated like any other drawn comb. I use it anywhere and everywhere. I actually use most of it now, in the middle of eight PF120 frames so that I can fit nine in an eight frame box. (eight PF120s and one PermaComb). So basically virtually all my boxes have one or more PermaComb (which have no spacers) and eight or less frames with spacers for a total of nine frames in my eight frame boxes.

But a few of them have boxes full of PermaComb. I have used some unwaxed lately, out of laziness and lack of time, but most of mine is wax coated by heating it to 200 F and dipping it in 200 to 212 F wax until it is full of wax and then shaking it all back out. This was mostly to get 4.9mm cells (probably closer to 4.8mm) but the other result was perfect acceptance by the bees. They treated it like drawn comb right off the bat. If you take cell taper and cell wall thickness into account PermaComb comes to about 5.0mm cell size.
 

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For MB:

Michael,

What does the spacing end up being between the pf120's and the Permacomb?
 

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>What does the spacing end up being between the pf120's and the Permacomb?

There is NO spacing on the PermaComb and I push them up tight to it, so the space from center to center is about 1 3/16" for the three frames, the one before, the PermaComb and the one after. Since the comb isn't drawn yet when I put it in, I'm guessing those get drawn a bit thinner. I consider 1 1/4" optimum spacing, but I've seen 1 3/16".

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesframewidth.htm
 

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This was one of those new things I had to try. Years ago. I'm surprised it's still around. The bees don't like it. It's heavy. It's not self spacing like other frames. It's narrower (top to bottom) so the bees built lots of bridge comb. It's a lot heavier. It's expensive. You can't just slice the cappings off to extract. Did I mention the bees don't like it?

The time you imagine the bees saving isn't worth any of the above. Get your bees early and feed them; they will draw wax faster than you think.

EAS this summer.
Man discussing permacomb:"Well, you can just crank up the extractor and THROW it out.
Me: "That's what I did."
MDP: "Cranked up the extractor"
Me" "No, threw it out!"
Cracked up 200 people. True story.

dickm
 
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