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when my wife was pregnant with our first we did as much research as we possibly could.we researched everything she ate and did. the most memorable thing she was not supposed to eat was sushi. now dont you think we should start cooking sushi as well? or should we just ban the sale of fish just in case some pregnant woman under cooks it. what if someone did not know any better and gave beer to their infant. lets ban beer! what if someone accidentally fed rancid meat to their infant? lets ban meat. my whole family drinks raw milk everyday and we are more healthy for it. pasteurization is a bad alternative to eating fresh food that has been handled properly.
 

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Per the Government of Canada:

This risk is present in both pasteurized and non-pasteurized honey...the temperatures used are not high enough to kill the spores that cause infant botulism.
Even if this weren't the case, I wouldn't process honey this much.
 

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I am wondering why someone would join a forum and then proceed to work the pasturization of honey into 3 out of the 5 posts he has made.
4 threads and 3 of them relate to your cause, the other being a political thread.
It seems there will be discussion and out of nowhere you throw in this pasturization issue you apparently feel is your mission in life.
Its almost like spamming in my opinion and it doesn't seem like you are finding any support for it.
This.

To try and give your argument merit by mentioning that your wife is an md also holds no water for me.
I find that the attempt to leverage the argument with the wife-is-an-MD to be suggest that she ain't much of a doctor--and a lot of the reason why doctors are losing their respected position in society as healers is because of nonsense activism like this. No responsible physician would even dare suggest that all honey be pasteurized--they simply tell people not to feed honey to infants.

Parents are responsible for every single thing that goes into their baby's mouth and I take issue that you state (repeatedly in most every post you make) it should be my responsibility in any way, shape or form.
This.
 

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Now, if my math is correct, we see 110 cases of botulism per year in the US, about 80 are infant botulism, and about 1 death per year results from it. Of those 80 cases, it's estimated that, at most, 16 are likely caused by honey that contains infant botulism spores. I'm probably not going to try and chase down how many infant deaths are caused by honey related botulism, as the number is so small that it is statistically insignificant and cannot reasonably be used as a rationale for pasturizing or not pasturizing honey.

In reading a half-dozen authoritative articles on infant botulism, none of them mentioned the need to pasturize honey, nor did they warn about pasturized vs. non-pasturized honey. They simply state that one should not feed honey to infants.
I would like to add that not only is it going to be statistically insignificant... but this would not be statistically significant at the 1% level.. (using anderson darling normality..)
 

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Hi Everyone, I have re-joined Beesource after a long break. I have learned a lot from this forum before and here is a question about this 'pasteurization' topic to keep learning from the experts: I can understand that heating honey may destroy some of its benefits and properties. I completely agree that killing Botulinum spores takes a lot more heat than used for the low heat-level honey "pasteurization". To me, low heat-level honey "pasteurization" is useful to kill yeast, which ferments honey. So, my question is: I have honey that for some reason never has a moisture content lower than ~18% and it sometimes ferments. This is no matter how careful I am during extraction and bottling. Fermented honey is not nice and I am sure also loses a lot of its properties, most obviously its taste.
Is there an alternative to prevent the fermentation?
 

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If you can keep your honey below 52F, it will not ferment, regardless of the yeast content of the honey. If you have 18% moisture in your honey and it is fermenting at room temperature, your floral sources are likely very high in yeast spores.

There is an urban myth that honey should not be refrigerated. There is no damage to honey by refrigeration. In fact, it prevents fermentation and likely preserves color and flavor more so than leaving it at room temperature over time.

Refrigeration does not encourage crystallization either. The optimum temperature for honey crystallization is 57F. The further you keep it away from 57F, the slower it crystallizes. That is in either direction. Typically, a refrigerator is set between 35F and 41F.

Freezing is the absolute best method of storing honey.

Cold arrests fermentation. Heat does too. When you keep honey above 100F, it will be very slow to ferment. However, maintaining honey at high temperatures for long periods of time destroys the enzymes, darkens the honey and changes the taste.

If you want to learn more about honey fermentation, storage and crystallization, search for Elton Dyce's 1934 study on the subject.
 

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Re: To infant botulism

Sorry, JonL, can't agree with you. The health benefits of natural honey by far out weigh the risk, FOR ME. Parents should be made aware that infants (one and under) are at risk for honey botulism, and I would choose not to feed any honey to such a young child (pastr. or not), but that's my choice. I have/had Jersey milk cows all of my married life (31 years now), raised 9 children on nonpastr. milk. Did have the cows tested every year when brus. was a problem in our area, but to me the health benefit out weighs the risk. Same with vaccination for children. I chose not to, and all my children are healthy, but can't say that for several of my friends who have had reactions to this monkey blood, and one whose 2 year old died from the reation.

It is the parents responsibility what a child eat. Label your honey natural and sell it as such. If you want pastr. dead honey, go to Wal Mart and buy your mixture of Chinese, Brazilian, Argentinian, African, and God only knows from where else. China puts all kinds of crap in our food, as we are finding out, but go ahead by that pastr. Chinese honey.

Sorry, but what you feed your child and at what age is not my responsibility. Thousands died in auto accidents every year, lot more than from infant botulism, maybe you should quit driving a car.

Danny
100% agree
do not feed < 2 years old honey,, and let it be RAW.
BTW there is little "need" for babys to have cooked honey AKA pure sugar, IMO

GG
 

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Freezing is the absolute best method of storing honey.
Thank you GG. I have never left a glass jar of honey out in the winter (this is Westchester NY I am talking about). Will it break? I have a little she and could leave the honey there during the winter.
 

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my chunk comb in a jar is done the following.
place the comb in the jars
place the jars in the freezer for 4 days
remove
allow to thaw
fill

if I have honey from dead outs in the spring,
I just put it in the freezer
pull a week prior to making spring splits.
IF you used a jar like the wide mouth pint where the jar get bigger all the way up, at 18% moisture, I do not think it would split, however I have not done it, the cells in the comb do not rupture so the sugar does not expand much

GG
 
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