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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 3 packages aren't scheduled for pick up until June 2nd. This is about 6 wks later than usual.

Given that I live in the White Mountains of NH and our summers can be quite short, will this give the colonies enough time to increase their population in time for winter?

I lost three hives last year...parly due to a cold, wet summer...hate to see it happen again.
 

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Bee numbers can double in 21 days so you would have enough time if you get a strong package. I would feed as long as they will take it, and get them into a full hive, if it begins to look as though they are beginning to backfill the brood chamber. add another! Concentrate solely on building bee numbers and storing supplies don't even think about splits or honey, watch your mite load close and heep the small hive beetles in check. healthy bees winter well. I have wintered packages in 90 days.
 

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That is late - my packages were hived several weeks ago - BUT they should be able to build up for winter ok. When is your first frost date in the fall? Put them on a scale to determine how much additional feeding they need (if any) at that point.

Even if things don't work out this year you will have drawn comb to start with next.

My 3 packages aren't scheduled for pick up until June 2nd. This is about 6 wks later than usual.

Given that I live in the White Mountains of NH and our summers can be quite short, will this give the colonies enough time to increase their population in time for winter?

I lost three hives last year...parly due to a cold, wet summer...hate to see it happen again.
 

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I agree with Tenbears. The might check at the end of summer or early fall is a very good idea. I lost to haves this winter and suspect it was my fault for not checking and being proactive about the mites. I will be treating with OA vapor this fall. (I know all treatments are a bit controversial, but I feel this is the best for me. will see how it works)
 

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If together have comb from last year and feed them (if you have comb with honey, all the better) you should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That is late - my packages were hived several weeks ago - BUT they should be able to build up for winter ok. When is your first frost date in the fall? Put them on a scale to determine how much additional feeding they need (if any) at that point.

Even if things don't work out this year you will have drawn comb to start with next.
First frost has been as early as October 1...speaking of drawn comb, all three hives are loaded with comb with quite a bit of honey...

In addition to everyone's suggestions (thanks, BTW) let's hope the blooms are bountiful and the weather warm so these girls get the best shot possible at surviving next winter!
 

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Your first frost is relatively late for the North - I figure on September 15th around here. The garden tools indicate that I should expect my last spring frost June 15th so we're used to a very short season. Check out Micheal Palmer's methods of weighing and winterizing. He is physically just one state away from you. I like the certainty of putting the hive on a scale knowing what I think it ought to weigh. Some people are good at telling their hive weight by hefting - I am not one of them.

With drawn comb to work with you shouldn't have any problems.
 

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You mentioned the hives are loaded with comb containing quite a bit of honey. Just to confirm, are there frames of empty cells that the queen can begin laying on from day 1? If things are filled with honey, leaving the queen no room to lay that could cause he to be slower that you will need. If the frames are mixed; with many in the center containing frames of empty cells then you are good but I wanted to confirm your comment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You mentioned the hives are loaded with comb containing quite a bit of honey. Just to confirm, are there frames of empty cells that the queen can begin laying on from day 1? If things are filled with honey, leaving the queen no room to lay that could cause he to be slower that you will need. If the frames are mixed; with many in the center containing frames of empty cells then you are good but I wanted to confirm your comment.
Good point, kenargo...I'll check the frames this wknd, but I don't remember there being an excessive amount of honey...
 

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