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and the fact you can use it with honey supers on is great.
got to ask as I must have missed something, when did they change the label and allow this to be used at all, and when did they make it legal to be used with supers on? asking for many friends.
 

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got to ask as I must have missed something, when did they change the label and allow this to be used at all, and when did they make it legal to be used with supers on? asking for many friends.
I believe the Aluen Cap strip has approval (or at least no condemnation) in Argentina where it is patented, for use with supers on. Presently they would not be an approved treatment in US. Since bees will not ingest glycerine and OA (unlike sugar syrup and OA) it appears not to contaminate honey.
 

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I would expect contamination from foot traffic and bee to bee contact, same meckasim the gets it off the strip an on to the mites. The hive is a giant pump to the suppers.. with receiver bees running a circuit form the entrance to the supers to drop of nectar

Meaningfully contamination is another story... the old X parts per billion of lead is alowed in drinking water etc, hopefully Randys studys will show some light on the subject
 

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<Meaningfully contamination is another story...> Yes. Oxalic acid is a natural component of honey and glycerine is GCAS: generally considered as safe. One of the common components of lip salves etc. The amounts added to honey in supers would probably be measurable but insignificant. I would much prefer those to to the traces of some of the other concoctions presently being used as miticides and insecticides.

Some Spanish speakers may be able to chase down the approval studies done on the Argentinian product. Eduardo Gomes, where are you!
 

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The video that you linked just a few posts ago Crofter, is about exactly what a lot of beekeepers are doing over here, just here they are doing it on a bigger scale, thousands of strips into thousands of hives.

It is not especially time consuming as against other treatment methods. Me, I have the cardboard cut to size by a local print shop, it works out to around US$0.05 per strip. Or about 20 US cents to treat a hive (for the cardboard), then also the cost of the OA / GL mix, probably doubling that cost. It is under a NZ$ to treat a hive so probably under US$0.50. Hives are treated 2 times a year.

The only bit I do not like about the process, is it is necessary to wear rubber gloves while placing the strips.
 

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I did not do a lot of digging to find the best price for the cardboard but for a trial that is not a concern. I double glove with the thin nitrile gloves. I usually use them single layer for most all my work on the bees so I am used to that. I think once you get a figure for absorption by whatever blotter material you use, you could get the fussing around to a minimum. I have a stack of 15kg. of the cardboard. Was thinking to run them across the table saw about 10 layers thick. It would fuzz the edges a bit compared to the sheared edge you get from the print shop.

I sewed up a few of the laminated drywall seam tape versions and decided that was not going to fly! Strips that get severed part way down by the bees will get layed flat on the bottom board for them to walk over. Still has some effect apparently.

If only every link on the internet was as clear and concise as that one! Excellent signal to noise ratio.
 

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I'm a new beekeeper and just recently came upon this method from Randy Oliver's website. When treating with OA/Glycerin has anyone seen any resistance or reason to treat with other methods at different times of the year? I currently use Apivar when there is no flow and OA vaporize at the end of the year when my hives are broodless. The OA/Gly method seems to be way more cost effective than Apivar, and in combination with a broodless vapor treatment seems like a great way to treat, especially if it gets EPA approval. Are there any downsides to moving to this method of treatment?
 

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At this time varroa do not seem to have developed any resistance to oxalic acid.

Yes there is a downside, which is that too much oxalic acid can weaken beehives, this is probably if it gets into the food supply and is fed to larvae, killing them. Larvae are most vulnerable to oxalic acid when they have just emerged from the egg. A symptom this is happening is brood going spotty after use of oxalic acid. You will not normally see dead larvae, because it is mostly very small ones that are killed and are immediately cleaned up by the bees.
 

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Discussion Starter #149
I can't believe my 'old' thread has had over 39k views.

Subject matter must strike a nerve or something...
 

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Just wanted to provide some feedback. 6th year keeper here, averaging between 3 and 7 colonies years 1-4. Year 5: Winter of 18-19 we went into the winter with 3, came out with 1. Zone 7 temperate climate, tends to be on the humid, heavy pollen side. Heavily populated with essential oil bee havers in the community. Did the usual 3 X OAV in August, but then tried the Oliver Blue shop towel experiment, placing 2 between the brood chamber in October. Left them on all winter, removed in spring. The 1 hive became 5 in 2019. Performed the same techniques 3 X OAV in August + blue shop towels over winter 19-20. 100% survival overwinter. 5 quickly became 20 this spring. We are repeating the experiment, only changing to bamboo towels, because of the mess of attempting to scrape off the overwintered blue towel remains. Our gals love to heavily decorate with propolis. Lets hope 3 years in a row becomes a trend! Best wishes all
 

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Are the bamboo towels also referred to as reuseable dish cloths? I have some on hand to try. About 6" square and will soak up about 50 grams of OA/Gly mix. Will try some of the 70 thou. thick cardstock material to make hanging strips for between frames. I found the shop towels on frame tops a bit of a nuisance but appear effective. Not seeing any mites in drone brood that I have opened. Mite drops were near zero last fall so have been lazy about doing mite counts this spring.
 

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Hallo all, Oliver has changed the proportions of the solution, this year he is checking for oa/gly 1:1 weight/weight. With this proportion cardboards appears nearly dry and some oa re-crystallizes. Has anyone tried?
 

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i am using a 2:2:1 solution ( by weight : 2 oxalic; 2 glycerin; 1 water ).
This solution cristalises at room temperture, so keep it at 40-50°C for application on the towels/cardboard ( you can keep your hands on).
The towels are "oily" looking with 20cc of the mixture.
IMG_20200823_083857_0.jpg
The towel is draped over the top bar. 1 towel per hive for normal treatment.
The solution migrates to the ends of the pending towel after some time.
 

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I bought a pack of similar OA from a firm in CANADA in about 1998, it was a grey coloured cloth material and you put a nail through the hole in the top and hung it between the frames, and the bees chewed it up and threw it out the entrance. from what I can remember it stayed moist and did not dry out
 
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