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JW, this is still new in an early experimental stage. Whatever is our findings we can share it here for all
to learn from. For the left over I would throw them away. To be more resourceful, measure out the amount of
oa + glycerine and how many roll of towels you need. Test out a small batch first and then double or triple up for
the number of hives you have to treat. I already got the oa + glycerine but choose to opt out of the treatment program
for now.
 

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moving forward---this is my take --25ml of glycerin--25 grams of OA--this is a towel (1 towel )
1 gallon of glycerin =3785 ml--dived by 25--gives use 151 towels--------
so 151 towels needs 25 grams per towel-----3775 grams to do 151 towels--thats 8.3 pounds of OA
(seams like a lot to go into solution)---but that is where the warming of the glycerin is important---
so my big question would be DOSE THE OA STAY IN SOLUTION AFTER IT COOLLS TO ROOM TEMP
this is important --the reason is when the towels are made-can it be done in a beeyard with pre made solution

we run shop towels all the time--best way to do shop towels is cut the roll in half--you could mix a gallon
batch in a five gallon bucket--full rolls are not ideal in this respect--half rolls are easy to absorb in a gallon
of mixture--full rolls are not easy to work on the fly--if a full towel is required then two half towels are placed
--what i am trying to get is a way to do this with repeat success in the field--the warming of the glycerin would
be the bottle neck-runing shop towels has already been perfected----what say yea--RDY-B
 

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When you warm the glycerin and start adding the OA the mixture goes cloudy and loses temperature so one has to continue heating and stirring until the mixture is completely clear. It can then be removed and stored, the OA remains dissolved in the glycerin, once added to cardboard or towels after a period of time the glycerin seems to evaporate and will leave crystals of OA behind. Anyway this is what I have found for what its worth.
Johno
 

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Oliver states that he heats the glycerin to the temperature of "hot coffee" before mixing in the OA. I know I read too much into things, but "hot coffee" is somewhat vague. You brew coffee just under boiling. You drink coffee just around 100 degrees. That is a 100 degree delta. Questions:

1. What temperature should I bring the glycerine before mixing the OA?
2. Should I use a respirator?
3. Can this be done safely inside on my kitchen stove top?

I will only be making up a dozen or so towels and will only use the minimum amounts of OA and glycerin to make them. Thanks.
 

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I put this in another thread about glycerin and OA. I mixed about 200 grams at a time using an old coffee machine that I use to melt beeswax. Remove the top section of the coffee machine and only use the bottom heater. this is controlled at about 180F so you can not overheat the mixture. Do not use the glass coffee container, you need to find a metal jug to fit the hot plate. Heat the glycerin until quite hot then start adding the OA stirring as you go. an endo thermic reaction seems to take place and the glycerin cools quite a bit but just continue stirring until the liquid becomes clear. when I did this there was no emission of any volatile gas, although if you had to boil the glycerin formic acid could be liberated. Be careful not to get any in you eyes.
Johno
 

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I put this in another thread about glycerin and OA. I mixed about 200 grams at a time using an old coffee machine that I use to melt beeswax. Remove the top section of the coffee machine and only use the bottom heater. this is controlled at about 180F so you can not overheat the mixture. Do not use the glass coffee container, you need to find a metal jug to fit the hot plate. Heat the glycerin until quite hot then start adding the OA stirring as you go. an endo thermic reaction seems to take place and the glycerin cools quite a bit but just continue stirring until the liquid becomes clear. when I did this there was no emission of any volatile gas, although if you had to boil the glycerin formic acid could be liberated. Be careful not to get any in you eyes.
Johno
I would not use a metal container! Pyrex glass pitcher for kitchen measuring would be much safer.
 

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Use whatever you like, I have done this a couple of times using an aluminum container without any problems. I used to melt wax on the old coffee machine using the glass container that came with the coffee machine until that cracked one day and spread hot wax all over so since then I have stayed with aluminum containers.
Johno
 

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http://teca.fao.org/comment/2319#comment-2319

Temperatures here. Recommended 55 - 58 Centigrade to dissolve the oa in the glycerine. From other bits I have read, holding at higher temperatures causes formation of tartaric acid and formic acid which will start to gas off. The idea is just to dissolve it not convert to the other compounds though some of the applied for patents seem headed that way.

None of what I have read speaks about flammabilty while heating and I have not looked up the specs on glycol but I will, or will do a small sample test before I would heat any amount of it in an open pan above an open heat source.

If you use glass container consider a water bath not direct contact with flame or element.
 

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I'm worried now!
The usual treatment is quick to knocked out the mite in 3-4 weeks session. If these strips or towels stay in
the hives all winter long 3-4 months and the bees cannot take the bits and pieces out of the hive, I wonder if the
mites CAN develop better resistant to the oa treatment this way. I mean the oa stays longer inside the hive not the
usual fast 3 minutes treatment using the oa vaporizer. Will it be better to treat one week before the new cap broods emerged?
Then let the towels sit for one more week before physically removing them from the hives. Concern, concern!
 

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In Randy's article he says the bees remove the shop towel in 3 to 4 weeks.
 

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there is some information about OA/GLY effect on queens or bees?, some beekeepers say if the strips are more than 4 weeks is detrimental for the colony, y say especifically with 4 strips per colony, mixing 1kg glycerin with 0,6 kg oxalic acid, and these quantity is for 800 strips.
 

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BeePro, I have not yet played with OA and glycerine but plan to I was wondering if anyone had tried mixing it with canola oil in place of glycerin? I would like to hear your thoughts or anyone else's.
 

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Be careful if you use the glycerin/OA towels don't drape them over the frame top bar. In some of my hives the SHB larvae have hatched under the towels and the bees don't seem to be able to remove them. I have since placed them all on the top bars.
 

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I was wondering if anyone had tried mixing it with canola oil in place of glycerin? I would like to hear your thoughts or anyone else's.
you need a polar solvent to dissolve OA.
a quick way to look at it is if it mixes with water it will likely dissolve OA... Ie rubbing alcohol and glycerin
if it doesn't mix, ie oil and water, it will not dissolve

while glycerin appears "oily", it is in fact an alcohol and a highly polar solvent and will dissolve much more OA per ML than water
also the glycerin causes the OA to be absorbed by the bee.. that is why OAD has sugar in it and it fails to work when used with plain water
 

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I already bought the oa and glycerine.
Since glycerine cannot be mix with water on the towels and
it is not a oil, I don't think the vegetable oil will work either.
Also the veggie oil is too oily for the bees to haul the towels out
of the hive. If you want to do this experiment try the crisco baking
oil instead. Melt the crisco oil first then mix in the oa powder. Finally
run this mixture through the towels. ONce the oils cool down this mixture
can be put inside the hive. Wear protective gears as this is a new experiment also. Do your research first
before making your own concoction. Crisco (baking) oil + oa powder!
 

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Randy says he is working on mixing in some rubbing alcohol to lessen the oilyness and encouraging the bees to remove the towels quicker. Won't the rubbing alcohol just evaporate once in the hive? Maybe this is the point?
 

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Be careful if you use the glycerin/OA towels don't drape them over the frame top bar. In some of my hives the SHB larvae have hatched under the towels and the bees don't seem to be able to remove them. I have since placed them all on the top bars.
That is a good point ty for bringing that up! SHB would love that hiding place they hide under hops guard strips too.
 

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Ty msl, and beepro for your reply's I will be trying the OA/glycerin out this season it looks promising. We have had good luck with OA vapor but it is a lot of trips chasing bees when they are scattered out in yards. And other products have there own set of drawbacks as well. I see OA/glycerin as one more tool added to the fight!
 
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