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Is anyone doing OAV this winter?

I performed a treatment towards the beginning of December, some colonies dropped several hundred mites.

The temperatures have not cooperated since that time.

Is it worth trying to give them a second winter OAV treatment?

Here I was thinking we'd have one of those unusually warm January days, but that is not materializing this year.
 

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Is anyone doing OAV this winter?

I performed a treatment towards the beginning of December, some colonies dropped several hundred mites.

The temperatures have not cooperated since that time.

Is it worth trying to give them a second winter OAV treatment?

Here I was thinking we'd have one of those unusually warm January days, but that is not materializing this year.
wow several hundred
so in winter what do the mite do? wait around for brood to start, or hop on a bee and start chewing a hole in it?

may just need to wait for a nice day.
maybe have a green frame ready for the couple hives dropping the most.

I do not normally do an OAV in winter, with El ninwhatever I may get a chance this year.
IMO the OAV would get to more of the bees/mites if it were warmer in the hive......looser cluster

GG
 

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You don't have your State listed. It may help in your profile when asking questions as Canada/Maine border is very different then Coastal RI :)
 

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Below about 45 degrees F the bees are clustered tightly enough that the cloud of crystals won't penetrate much. Above that and it will work, doesn't have to be strong flying weather
 

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Below about 45 degrees F the bees are clustered tightly enough that the cloud of crystals won't penetrate much. Above that and it will work, doesn't have to be strong flying weather
Not so sure about the above, another urban legend perhaps. I cannot see that a treatment below 40 degrees can do any harm but on the other hand may do a deal of good. I personally am of the opinion that when vapor invades a clustered hive the bees will panic and break cluster. It would be interesting for somebody to do some tests and get to what actually will happen.
 

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I personally am of the opinion that when vapor invades a clustered hive the bees will panic and break cluster. It would be interesting for somebody to do some tests and get to what actually will happen.
I suspect forcing a hive to break a cluster when it is cold is a bad idea
 

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If a colony has a decent amount of top insulation the temperature inside will be well above the outside temperature. Our temperature has been hovering just around freezing for the last week and most of my colonies have some bees on the doorstep and doing cleansing flights. Would not seem to indicate a very tight cluster.
If I felt the bees had a dangerous mite level I would consider the chance of an OA vapor treatment the lesser evil by far. The disturbance might cause them to burn up an extra teaspoon of honey though.
 

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I did an OA treatment mid December on a 60 degree day here in South Carolina. Results were good as I had also done a 42 day Apivar treatment in SEP/Oct. I do my OA treatment from the top and I seem to get great results. I do remove the super for the OA treatment as well. Additionally, I plan on doing another OA top treatment between mid January and mid February on a 50 plus degree day.
 

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We did two OAV's so far, one late Nov, one mid late Dec, we will do another in Jan/Fed dependent on weather.

46 today and the bees started flying at 38, swarming the ponds for water.
 

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I have started doing 2 oavs in the winter based upon a fairly recent study that makes me think it is worth it. I saved a copy of the study but cannot access it due to computer issues. If someone has it, please post a link.
I did my first winter OAV on 12/24 when it was 52F. I planned on another but life got in the way. But if I had your numbers I would find the time to do another shot.
OAV never effectively covers all of the bees. It is even more challenging when they are tightly clustered. Pick the warmest day in the next few days, give them two puffs of smoke and listen for their reaction. If no humming after a minute, give them two more puffs and do OAV even if you don't hear them. That's what I have done successfully. I have had very low counts coming into spring that allows me to wait until late July/early August to treat again. Generally, I have done it at 40F and above which is what is recommended. J
 

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I do 2 treatments in the winter. One around Thanksgiving and another a month later about Christmas. I do my next treatments after i rob in July. I do a series of 6 ,1 every 5 days then a month later i do another series of 6 .This gives my hives 12 total treatments for the year. This is what JohnO says he does and it has definitely works for me.
 

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An expert explained that if you do an OAV treatment while bees are in their winter cluster, it isn't likely to reach the bees with mites that are on the inside. Once they break cluster you'll get a more efficient treatment.
 

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I treated OAV today. Sunny & 47 degrees F. Some flying more on inner cover feeding so the cluster had broken. Last treated the two weekends before Christmas. I plan two + more shots 5 - 6 days apart. Red maple and blueberries are budding so I want to be finished treating by March 15. If buds break supers go on. I think winter treatments are good insurance. If the cluster is too tight I'll still get a few mites.
 

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One interesting thing I've noticed about OAV treatments... bees out flying and piling up at the door during the treatment process all go inside after the treatment and then a few minutes later the guard bees are back out.
 

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Yep, minimally disruptive to the hive. I have noticed that within a few minutes it is business as usual in the hive and I probably could work the bees if I were so inclined.
 

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Not luck....OBSERVATION..... The bees were flying and having a party on the inner cover. If you don't look, you don't know.
 
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