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Hi, I applied an Oxalic Acid treatment to my hives yesterday using the dribble method. I've done this in previous years and I like this method as I dont have to buy and special equipment, I dont have to worry about PPE or setting my hives on fire.
I have a little bit of a hard time applying the exact 5ml amount to each seam. It occurred to my that I could apply the solution with a hand spray bottle like windex or other cleaners come in. Any one else use this method, tried it or heard of it?
Thanks
 

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Any one else use this method, tried it or heard of it ? Thanks
Sure - it was a popular method of application back in the 90's. There's a write-up about it's efficacy at: http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/oxalicspray.html

If I were ever to stop using a vapouriser - but can't think why I'd do that - then spray (but not mist) would be my application of choice.

Plus's - much better coverage than dribbling, and no need to add sugar, so that much less OA (if any) would be ingested. Not that ingestion is a proven hazard - I just don't like the idea of imposing a substance within the bee's diet.

Minus's - a far more invasive, hazardous, and lengthy procedure than either Dribbling or Vapourisation.
There's a clear need for full PPE here (especially if misting, rather than spraying), as you'd be less than an arm's length away from an acidic aerosol at all times.
LJ
 

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With dribbling, the recommendation is to do each seam of bees. So with anything but a single, one has to tip the top box up or lift it off to get to the seams in the lower box.

Effiacy drops to something like 60% from 90plus% if one only does the seams in the top box.

I over winter in double deeps, and use oxalic vapor treatments in the fall and Apivar in early spring.
 

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I like this method as I dont have to buy and special equipment, I dont have to worry about PPE or setting my hives on fire.
Has someone set their hives on fire treating mites?
 

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Interesting, it appears that I have misunderstood what seam of bees meant. I have been told that a maximum of 50 mL of oxalic acid solution should be applied to each colony (5 mL per seam, 10 seams). If I have a double brood box, is that 20 seams of bees? If so, do I reduce the dosage to 2.5 mL per seam to not exceed the 50 mL max?
 

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I was thinking of pulling the frame out and “spritzing” each side
not approved in the US
much ruffer on the bees
takes longer
not any more effective
a lose lose lose

If I have a double brood box, is that 20 seams of bees
no, you split the box and drible the seams that are there on the bottom. it spreads threw the hive very very quiclky by bee to bee contact.. in 10 min its almost every bee, 30min its on every bee and every surface in the hive
 

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Just use OAV, and try to become treatment free.

Equipment cost:
  1. I'm assuming you have these: extension cord, gloves, power supply, small amount of aluminum foil (to make a cup in the heater), metal thing to hold the heater above wood, screened bottom boards
  2. immersion heater: $5-10
  3. ply wood: $5
  4. optional: mask $30
  5. optional: swimming goggles

If you don't use goggles, close your eyes when you are very close to the vapor. Instead of a mask, put a clip on your nose. When you're within 50 feet of the vapor, don't breathe.

Total equipment cost: $15
 

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Randy Oliver has a write up on using a garden sprayer and how to control the right amount. I find his site really hard to search and so did not take the time to find the link but if someone is interested, it is there.
Cheers
gww
 

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Interesting, it appears that I have misunderstood what seam of bees meant. I have been told that a maximum of 50 mL of oxalic acid solution should be applied to each colony (5 mL per seam, 10 seams). If I have a double brood box, is that 20 seams of bees? If so, do I reduce the dosage to 2.5 mL per seam to not exceed the 50 mL max?
See info in attached link. Randy indicates upwards of 100 mL for a double deep. Also note, tipping top brood and applying to every seam.

http://scientificbeekeeping.com/oxalic-dribble-tips/
 

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I have heard of such an event but it was unconfirmed. I carry a 1/2 bucket of water to cool off my vaporizer between treatments and a water spray bottle. I have never started a fire but have seen singed, burnt marks, on wood. My expanded brood chamber approach seems to eliminate hanging wax in the entrance area.

I have confirmed that beeswax left in Vorrox vaporizer and powered for significantly longer than the prescribed time. This resulted in heating the beeswax followed by ignition. Think beeswax candles!
 

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LJ,
The Cushman study at #3 is a no sugar mix. Wonder how results compare to the usual (USA) mix. 62 % kill on a single treatment does not sound bad. Not clear if that was a total hive kill or an uncapped plus capped kill. Test was done a day or two weeks after treatment.

Have single story nucs that a dribble is much more appealing than smoking.

Anyone have thoughts /experience on sugarless v sugar dribble.
 

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I have not but it is doable. Forget the vaporizer in place and leave power on with bees wax close by or touching the pan in a somewhat closed area - ignition. I demonstrated this to myself - think it took about 15 minutes (conditions vary and time varies). Beeswax is candle material

I have not started a fire from my novice beginnings until now 6 years later and thousand plus applications of OAV.
 
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