Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day all.


I treated my hives with Apivar in the fall after the supers came off. I didn't get a mite level check done before cold weather set in.


Should I do an oxalic acid application? The next week has highs in the high 50s, so I can open a hive without a risk of excessive chill.


Should I do a sugar shake evaluation or just go ahead and treat them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
Good day all.


I treated my hives with Apivar in the fall after the supers came off. I didn't get a mite level check done before cold weather set in.


Should I do an oxalic acid application? The next week has highs in the high 50s, so I can open a hive without a risk of excessive chill.


Should I do a sugar shake evaluation or just go ahead and treat them?
Vaporization or liquid? Apivar is usually very effective but OA Vaporization does not appear to cause mortality. Also does not need the hive opened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
A dribble application would work very well this time of year. Do not do the sugar shake, just do the OAD application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Went and snagged a vaporizer at a local supply place.

Going to treat them tomorrow afternoon.

Thanks to everyone for the advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
I winter OAV to prepare for Spring and Summer. I do not have to open the hives to treat or verify efficacy. Sticky board count provides the information I need to know. My updated plan is to OAV twice, 14 days apart. This should result in a 99.7% efficacy according to the Univ. of Sussex, England researcher - makes sense to me. I have been able to avoid treating, verified by drone and worker brood brood removal and inspection, until Fall after the supers are removed.

The nice thing about OAV is the efficacy at low temperatures, down to 38F and being able to treat without opening a hive. If unable to OAV, dribble is effective too but be quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Dribble has pros and cons and apparently limited number of applications (unconfirmed by me) but OA Vaporization is recommended over OA Dribble based on by Univ. of Sussex field test. Learn to use the vaporizer properly, carry water with you for wand cooling and cleaning. I have used the Varrox for four years - good, tough design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Got married recently and with busy work/personal schedule, am behind the eight ball in catching up with apiary care. Wanting to apply oxalic acid dribble (temps low 40's here in NH today). Have no help today 1/3/2019. Running 2 deeps. Wondering if there is any concern in applying dribble to top box only. Won't the dribble drop down to the lower box as well? This obviates the need to separate the deeps saving time, labor and conserving warmth for bees. I would still apply max of 50 ml per hive of the lower concentration oxalic/water/glycerin (as outlined on Randy Oliver's Scientific Beekeeping site). Very dense seams could get a bit more than 5 ml assuming it will spread to both boxes, again maintaining max 50 ml per hive guideline. Would appreciate thoughts/suggestions/critique, etc. Thank you and Happy New Year all.

Best, Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
According to our now retired Provincial Apiarist, efficacy with only dribbling top brood box is around 60%, which is not great! Need to dribble each brood box if desire efficacy 90% plus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Thank you mgolden for your reply and advice. I opened the boxes for the ox acid dribble as you suggested. 2 hives had bees in both boxes. the other 3 hives had bees only in top deep. Used 2.6% ox solution with H2O and gylcerin; max 50 ml per hive. Would have bee nice to know which hives had bees only on top. Would have saved time and labor (as would not have to unwrap my winter insulation to access the top box only.) But of course, how would I know which hives occupied only the top boxes until I opened them? LOL. Not sure if FLIR would be useful for this in future. Appreciate the advice. I'll go out today and look for mite drops on my slide out boards.

Best, Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Please post what total three day mite drop is.

Dribble is easier to use if one is running single deeps. I suspect FLIR would help considerably to detect where most of bees are. However, bees should be loosely clustered for any oxalic treatment so I'd suspect that would always be some in both broods.

Oxalic vapor can be applied readily through the entrance, even with insulation on. Hence, real user friendly with two deeps and when insulation has been installed. Just another approx. $200 for vaporizer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Please post what total three day mite drop is.

Dribble is easier to use if one is running single deeps. I suspect FLIR would help considerably to detect where most of bees are. However, bees should be loosely clustered for any oxalic treatment so I'd suspect that would always be some in both broods.

Oxalic vapor can be applied readily through the entrance, even with insulation on. Hence, real user friendly with two deeps and when insulation has been installed. Just another approx. $200 for vaporizer!
Thank you again for reply. Yes, dribble vs. vaporization (and to be clear we are not talking about fogging, correct?). I need to review data but vapor can be used multiple times a year, dribble only once (due to toxic effect on bees.) There are concerns regarding igniting the hive, inhaling vapor (would need to wear my organic respirator), need for power (battery vs. house current) to run vaporizer. etc. I run screened bottom boards with slideout panels for mite counts which I keep in place for winter and remove for summer ventilation. This is not an airtight system and closing it off off would be challenging. So vapor would escape from bottom. Hmmm, will need to do some reading and thinking about this but at least the issue is covered for me this winter. Thank you for sharing your thoughts. Best, Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,908 Posts
I need to review data but vapor can be used multiple times a year, dribble only once (due to toxic effect on bees.)
https://www.researchgate.net/public...a_destructor_against_oxalic_acid_A_study_case
"A commercial apiary composed by 54 colonies of a re-gional ecotype of A. mellifera located at Federal (30°57'4.42"S 58°47'55.78"W: Entre Rios province, Ar-gentina) was selected as biological model for the assays. In this apiary, the OA was topically applied as the sole option for Varroa control during eight consecutive years (2000-2008). Thus, this V. destructor population was considered as the „focal‟ population in our study. An average of eight treatment applications (± one) per year was made"

There are EU approved pre packed dribble products rated for 9 treatments a year. https://static1.squarespace.com/sta...er+Final+v01.1+Ernie+confirmed+2017-08-31.pdf

Key is you only hit winter bees once
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Yes talking about vaporizing. I have not heard good reports of fogging. I see next to zero affect on bees of multiple vaporization. Have done eight weekly treatments and more recently 4-5 treatments 4 days a part.

I don't care for the idea of bees ingesting oxalic for the dribble method.

It would be very hard to ignite a hive easy vap style of vaporizer. I use the Varrox and burr comb off the bottom frames ?could start a fire. I do an August clean up of bottom burr comb to prevent a fire, prior to first vaporizing. Had an Oops one day a few years ago where I left Varrox on for ten minutes and charred bottom board and bottom of wood frame, smoke but no fire.

Varrox is 12 V so one can always get to a vehicle or lawn tractor battery. At 15 mins per hive, it is not overly onerous for a few hives.

The vaporizing is a great tool for a mid Oct to Xmas(depending your local) knock down of mites when hive is broodless.

I also use the vaporizing as my tool to do a mite check. Vaporize, put in the sticky board and count total mite drop after 72 hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Noted. Will forward the article to Provincial Apiarist for their take on it.

It is curious that the study is 2015 and little dissemination to beekeepers?????????
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top