Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,035 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have an outyard that is a nice secure location, on the edge of a very large alfalfa field. The location also has great sun exposure and nice wind break. Just found out today that the gate gets opened when the snow flies, and stays open for the winter. It seems the access road I am using turns into a snowmobile trail. The good news is I will be able to get to the hives at any time. Anybody ever have a trail go past their hives? Any trouble with?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Not in a snow state by any means but your bees should be in a Winter cluster so a snowmobile trail next to them should be no problem. You see folks with hives next to busy highways, streets, railroads, etc and they don't have much of a issue during other times of the year. Only if it warms up enough will they venture out for cleansing flights.

The only thing I might do is construct a fence out of the orange construction type barricade material to keep folks from running into them if you have white hive bodies blending in with the white snow. Also will hopefully discourage folks from messing with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
I have a feeling that people will be messing with them, either purposely (vandals) or inadvertently (a convenient trail-side table). Either way, I think you're going to wind up with broken clusters sometime through the winter, which will probably result in death of the colony.

My rule of thumb is to either keep them where EVERYONE can see them, all the time, and someone COULD be watching. Or where NO ONE can see them, and nobody knows they're even there. A locked gate is also a nice feature, but not all my bee yards offer such a thing.

Why not move them, just to be on the safe side? We're getting toward the end of the season anyways. Why take the chance?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Has anyone moved their outyard hives to a winter location after the last bloom? After the last honey has come off and the flora has been killed off by frost, band them up and move them home and put them back out in the spring.
Moving into winter indoor storage is not unusual in the far north.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top