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I read some time back about the origins of notching cells to produce queens, such as is done in OTS (On The Spot) queen rearing, being in the 1800's and being published in a book around 1910, but I cannot remember where I read about it or what the original source was. Can anyone point me a reference to it?
 

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"How to Keep Bees" by Anna Botsford Comstock 1854-1930 copyright 1905 Doubleday, Page & Company on page 156

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=ncs1.ark:/13960/t0wq08m6c;view=1up;seq=11

"CHAPTER XIV
"REARING AND INTRODUCING QUEENS
"QUEEN-REARING
"In a small apiary there is little need for the special rearing of queens ; the natural increase may safely be depended upon to supply all the colonies which lose their queens or which have unprofitable ones. It is always well for even the most casual bee-keeper to take the trouble to re-queen from his strongest and best colonies. However, the time when queen cells are naturally built may not be the most convenient or the most desirable time for giving certain colonies a new mother. This being the case, queens may be developed through the power of suggestion, as follows: Select a frame of brood from the best colony; with a toothpick tear down the partitions between three worker cells which contain eggs or larvae less than two days old and destroy two of the eggs or larvae; repeat the operation in several places. Place the frame back in the hive, being very sure that there is sufficient space between it and its neighbouring frame, so that good queen cells may be built. If there is a scarcity of honey, feed the bees. The cleverness of bees is clearly proven by the readiness with which they take a hint, and they almost invariably build queen cells upon the comb thus treated.

"This method we have found perfectly satisfactory, but for those who rear queens for sale, other very interesting practices have been invented. The greatest of these was devised by Mr. Doolittle, one of the foremost queen-breeders in America. He makes artificial queen cells by dipping a small, smoothly rounded stick in warm wax repeatedly, thus making a little cup, thin at the edge and thick at the bottom. Rows of these little cups are placed on a bar the thickness of a brood-frame and fastened there with hot wax. In each cup is introduced a bit of royal jelly and a very young larva. The bar is then inserted horizontally into a frame of brood-comb, part of the latter being cut away to give room for the future cells, which project down from the bar. In such a royal nursery, he develops his queens for the market."
 
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