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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
One of them was either queenless, or something bad happened, a small cluster was found heads in the cells. Starvation. Still 30 pounds of honey, died right next to it.

The rest of the colonies had about 30 or 40 pounds remaining.

Anyone else check their colonies up in the Northeast to evaluate the amount of honey they have remaining?
 

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Heater bees stick their head in a cell and vibrate wing muscles to keep surrounding brood and bees warm. They don't take a last lick of honey and die in the cell. Your hive most likely died from viruses or possibly a poor queen.
 

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One of them was either queenless, or something bad happened, a small cluster was found heads in the cells. Starvation. Still 30 pounds of honey, died right next to it.
I have seen this in small hives that I lost. I think is is called isolation starvation and is caused by the cluster being to small to move in the cold, and then getting stuck without any food. When it happened to me it was small clusters due to mite problems in the fall.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Checked out another apiary yesterday. Survival rate is excellent. One perished due to rodent.

Certain colonies appeared more robust than others, and I performed winter OAV.

Difficult to determine how many will survive at this point.

From the other days inspection, the broodless period may not be much longer.
 
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