Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my three hives developed chalk brood in mid August - always about 4-20 mummies between the entry, bottom board and screen bottom. I read up and expected it to clear itself, but it is continuing. The hive seems otherwise healthy, started this spring as a package. In that time I did find some mummies in front of one of the other hives once, but no signs since in that hive. We had an August/September drought, so seemingly not a moisture issue. Anything to worry about?
 

·
Registered
6a 4th yr 9 colonies inc. 2 resource hives
Joined
·
743 Posts
Just so you know Michael may be the best beekeeper of this generation. Its a gas when he answers your question. Last year I was desperate to make the right over wintering decisions and he responded to my post. I had 100% over winter. You can take his advice to the bank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh, yes, I know and respect Michael's work - had the pleasure and the learning experience of being at one of his talks. Thanks, Michael, for the feedback and advice. I'll follow up in the spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Just so you know Michael may be the best beekeeper of this generation. Its a gas when he answers your question. Last year I was desperate to make the right over wintering decisions and he responded to my post. I had 100% over winter. You can take his advice to the bank.
(y)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
45 Posts
Chalk brood is a fungus right? So if requeening solves it, that means the fungus has infected the old queen, and therefore her brood.

Is that correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,288 Posts
I think it more likely that Chalkbrood is spread my nurse bees as they feed the larvae. With a high spore load in the colony, the disease persists. Hygienic colonies recognize infected brood and remove it from the colony...even before the spore forming stage. I had a severe outbreak in 1998. Many colonies stinky rotten with chalk. Piles of mummies on the bottom boards. Requeened with a carniolan stock selected for high hygienic response. A month later, I couldn't find a mummy. By selecting breeding stock in my apiary, that has never shown as much as one mummy, the trait persists to this day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,510 Posts
I think it more likely that Chalkbrood is spread my nurse bees as they feed the larvae. With a high spore load in the colony, the disease persists. Hygienic colonies recognize infected brood and remove it from the colony...even before the spore forming stage. I had a severe outbreak in 1998. Many colonies stinky rotten with chalk. Piles of mummies on the bottom boards. Requeened with a carniolan stock selected for high hygienic response. A month later, I couldn't find a mummy. By selecting breeding stock in my apiary, that has never shown as much as one mummy, the trait persists to this day.
(y) Truth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
Or put the hive on foundation next spring. We have seen contaminated wax as being a factor also.

Crazy Roland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
572 Posts
Likewise on Mike Palmer commenting on your post...kind of like Babe Ruth giving you batting tips.

RE: chalk Brood, I have also found that replacing all the old comb/frames helps as well as a new box. I’m small enough that I can do that. Not sure a fairly large operation would find it feasible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,831 Posts
treat your mites with apiguard, haven't had any chalkbrood since I started using it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A few years ago I used acetic acid fuming to sterilise equipment after a nosema infection. I'll do that in the spring with this hive and swap in new frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,450 Posts
Certain bee strains get it, others do not. Change queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
One of my three hives developed chalk brood in mid August - always about 4-20 mummies between the entry, bottom board and screen bottom. I read up and expected it to clear itself, but it is continuing. The hive seems otherwise healthy, started this spring as a package. In that time I did find some mummies in front of one of the other hives once, but no signs since in that hive. We had an August/September drought, so seemingly not a moisture issue. Anything to worry about?
One of my three hives developed chalk brood in mid August - always about 4-20 mummies between the entry, bottom board and screen bottom. I read up and expected it to clear itself, but it is continuing. The hive seems otherwise healthy, started this spring as a package. In that time I did find some mummies in front of one of the other hives once, but no signs since in that hive. We had an August/September drought, so seemingly not a moisture issue. Anything to worry about?
I had chalk brood spreading thorough my yard several years ago and a local 3rd generation bee keeper prescribed a 50/50 mix of powder sugar and pickling lime, sprinkled about 1/4 cup on the top bars of the hive. I had tried several home grown cures and I requested, nothing was working. The sugar and lime worked. His theory was the lime changed the PH of the hive which killed the chalkbrood. After five years I have not had any more chalk brood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks - something else to try, maybe in conjunction with a queen change in spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
A few years ago I used acetic acid fuming to sterilise equipment after a nosema infection. I'll do that in the spring with this hive and swap in new frames.
I should have noted that it's the empty equipment that gets sterilized this way - not the hive! It is supposed to kill various spores/diseases including chalk brood fungus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Chalk brood is a fungus right? So if requeening solves it, that means the fungus has infected the old queen, and therefore her brood.

Is that correct?
Don't thinks so. It is more about the hygenic habits of the colony.
I had a colony with quite a lot of chalk brood last year. I new swarm colony in the same hive cleaned it all.

It is amazing how different colonies have different personalities. They just behave differently.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top