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Discussion Starter #1
I have the opportunity to buy an old Walter t. Kelly hand crank extractor the baskets are a little rusty but it works good a friend of my son does powder coating paint and was going to sand blast the baskets and crank parts but I really like the vintage appearance, suggestions on keeping it like it is or powder coating and value of the extractor , the baskets turn to extract both sides of the frame Thanks
 

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I had a conversation with someone who buys old extractors. He said most pre-80's extractors are lead seamed, and food safe practice requires the solder to be removed or thouroughly covered. I've never investigated this issue personally, but seems a lead test would be responsible.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I had a conversation with someone who buys old extractors. He said most pre-80's extractors are lead seamed, and food safe practice requires the solder to be removed or thouroughly covered. I've never investigated this issue personally, but seems a lead test would be responsible.
Wow wasn't expecting that , kinda wondering now if I should go another way thanks. Thanks
 

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old extractors seem to sell well on that big internet auction site. but by the time you repair, deal with relining and try to match up old parts I can not see much value myself. maybe it is worth it for the big ones that cost thousands but for smaller size extractors close to free is plenty.
 

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Applying Camcote is one approach to use to deal with possible issues with older galvanized extractors.

While lead is not good to ingest, encapsulated lead is no threat. There are many miles of residential copper water piping soldered with lead based solder.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I had a conversation with someone who buys old extractors. He said most pre-80's extractors are lead seamed, and food safe practice requires the solder to be removed or thouroughly covered. I've never investigated this issue personally, but seems a lead test would be responsible.
I spoke with Kelly bees this morning they told their older extractors , where they came in contact with honey were tinned not leaded so I feel better about that so I'm going fill it with water and molasses and let it soak then finish it off with a baking soda scrubbing and see what it looks like . I might try and post a pic if anybody is interested thanks again for the replies. Dennis
 
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