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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was recently given this extractor along with an electric hot knife and a few other supplies.

I don't currently have an extractor so i'd like to fix this one up to use for now if i can. I read somwhere about painting them with an epoxy based paint. Any one have different names, especially ones that would be easily available in canada?

I have an electric motor that i can rig to it and the only thing i really see wrong with this one is the bottom is rusty, looks worse than it is as its damp right now. I was also wondering if it would be worth my while to try to set teh baskets up so they are more like the spokes of a wheel? i think thats called radial?

Thanks for any information you can give me on this. I'd even be interested in knowing how old it is and other things like that.

thanks



 

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as stated if its stainless, I cant tell by the pics it can be cleaned up and probly used w/out coating, If its galvanized use the food grade epoxy coating suggested above. It looks like it will be a chore to buff it back to a brite finish I might consider the coating regardless of what it is. Kewl old extractor though, not sure about modifying it to extract radially, hard to say with out measurements and knowin what size frame you will be extracting from :)
 

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have a friend who has the same one looks just as old or older. i would leave it alone.
 

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leave it alone as in not modify or not use?
It all depends on the cost of your time and how much money you are willing to spend. The baskets appear to be galvanized steel. They are going to need to be sand blasted and coated, unless F W Jones sells replacements. The rest of the unit is definately galvanized, at the very least I'd coat it. There's rust coming through in a few areas. Lastly, making this into a radial will be a challenge, it can be done, probably for super frames only though. This isn't even taking in consideration the desire to make it electrically driven.

For me when I consider the time, effort, and money it will take to make this a useable unit, I'd leave it as a conversation piece and buy new. However, if you are a tinkerer, have gobs of time and a workshop, and are looking for a challenge this might be like a 9-year old getting a model plane kit during Christmas break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
LOOL, well i don't have lots of time but i have omre time than money so i don't mind spending some time on it. I already have a sand blaster so i don't mind spraying it down and painting it. I have a motor and the pulley is already on the unit so all i need is a belt and a bracket for the motor. What size motor would be good to drive it. i have ready access to a 1/3hp one.

Thanks
 

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Having a sand blaster yourself cuts a lot of challenge of repairing this right off the bat. Find a currently sold 4 or 6 frame extractor and see what they use (hp wise) to power it electrically. I'd bet this will put you within a hand grenades toss of what you should use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
that makes sense LOL i should have thought of that one by myself.

I was more worried about having blow outs etc using this style of extractor. Will they blow out plastic foundation too?
 

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When using this type of extractor, extract 30-50% of the honey from the first side, stop it, remove the frames, turn them around, reinstall them, then extract the other side completely. When done, repeat, putting the first side out, then finish extracting that side. This will minimize if not eliminate blowout.
Regards,
Steven
 

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I use an older manual Kelley 2-frame reversable extractor. Personally I have never had a blow out but I use all plastic foundation. I do get that thing humming during extraction though. I may have to upgrade to a 9 frame radial electric extractor shortly as I'm over 10 hives and could get overwhelmed if the girls produce strongly this year.
 

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Take it on the antiques road show. :)
 

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Not sure what you decided to do about the extractor, but if you wanted a simple, easy way to remove the rust. Fill it to the top with a mixture of 10:1 water and molasses. The molasses will react to the rust and it will come off after about 3-4 days. Basically buy a couple gallons of molasses from any horse or cattle farm. After about a few days you can drain it and take a pressure washer to the components and you will see it will go right down to the steel.

Do a search on youtube for "Rust molasses removal" you'll see what I mean.
here's an example
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-gBAjEga1s

Cheers
 

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"Rust molasses removal"...Now thats something I have never heard before.I love learning about these things. As far as the extractor goes I would clean it and coat it and put it to work. If your like me there is some sense of satisfaction in bringing neat old stuff back to life. A 1/3 or 1/2 HP motor will work fine you just want to have about a 1-4 pulley ratio to keep your drum from spinning too fast and blowing out comb.So if you have a 1 inch pulley on the motor go with a 4 or 5 inch pulley on the drum end. Post a picture when its done.
 

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I use an old 8 frame galvanized extractor similar to that from a different mfr. The previous owner modified the drive to use a 3/8 electric drill. A variable speed ac drill works better than cordless. I had a sandblaster just blast the worst rust and I did a little hand sanding then coated with the Cam-Coat from Brushy mountain. I don't think I would trade it for my friends 4 frame stainless hand crank job. I have plastic foundation in deeps and mediums and I can really spin that stuff and dry it out good. Shallows with un-wired wax, I do as mentioned above - slow spin on one side, turn and medium spin on the other side then turn back and medium spin the first side. Works great and cost next to nothing.
 

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"Rust molasses removal"...Now thats something I have never heard before.I love learning about these things. As far as the extractor goes I would clean it and coat it and put it to work. If your like me there is some sense of satisfaction in bringing neat old stuff back to life. A 1/3 or 1/2 HP motor will work fine you just want to have about a 1-4 pulley ratio to keep your drum from spinning too fast and blowing out comb.So if you have a 1 inch pulley on the motor go with a 4 or 5 inch pulley on the drum end. Post a picture when its done.
I most definitely know what you mean by sense of satisfaction. I've had bees in my family for over 120 years and there's lots of really old stuff collecting dust in the barn. I have a really old 50 frame radial extractor that has REALLY HEAVY cast iron supports on the top and a fly wheel that's about 18 inches in diameter. It was owned by my great grand-father back with the operation was much bigger than it is now. Its still working but has built up some rust on it. I'm using a 24 frame radial now, but would like to restore it back to it's former glory. They don't make stuff like they used to.

I would definitely consider the molasses removal especially for the baskets. Sandblasting might rip them apart. But the molasses is very gentle. Then when its stripped, take it and get the baskets and interior of the drum powder coated with food grade paint and you have a brand-new/antique machine. I would leave the outside (anything not in contact with honey) COMPLETELY untouched. To me there is a sentimental aspect in that aging that can't be reproduced. Plus the aging of the F.W. Jones sticker is really cool.
 
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