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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I purchased a 20 frame extractor (Maxant)from the family of a retired beekeeper. They "threw in" an old Walter T. Kelly Bottling tank.

1st) It's really dirty from, I assume, remnants of old honey with dust from over the years. How do I clean it and the paddles? Do I have to take it all apart and take the paddles out?

2) It has a copper wire from the thermostat that runs up over the top of the tank and down inside. It doesn't look original and it was duct taped into place. It is supposed to have a copper line into the tank but I don't know if it should be bare like it is or sleeved until in gets near the bottom of the tank. Anyone have any idea? What can I use to replace this? Copper Capillary tube? On the side where the water can is (looks like a large coffee can) and the thermostat and temp control, there is a copper tube coming out that has been crimped off about 6 inches out. Anyone know what this is? A drain maybe?

3) It works. The motor runs, the paddles turn but I haven't tested the heating element. Is this worth cleaning up and getting to work? It's large!

And, last but not least, the 20 frame Maxant extractor. That is much newer but a version I don't think they make anymore. That hasn't been used in years but works fine. Like the bottling tank, how do I clean the film of old honey and dust that's been there at least 10 years?

Thank you everyone.
 

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The copper line from the thermostat sounds like the sensor for the thermostat. Be carefull, it is part of the thermostat, and if damaged, the thermostat must be replaced. I believe it may have an oil in it that expands and opens the contacts.As for the rest, use your discresion as to it's value. If you need one, then fix it.

Crazy Roland
 

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If the tank doesn’t leak it should be fine. They did a lot of equipment that way. The copper wire is part of the controller. My wax melter has a knob to Set the temperature. The paddles are more for making cream honey. So they could be removed.
 

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Hey Bob. I have one exactly like that. It is made for creamed honey but we are turning it into a bottling tank to hook up to our ezy fill. I guess folks ate more creamed honey back in the day? The copper line is part of the thermostat for the water reservoir below the honey. You can still purchase thermostats from kelleys for these tanks also. I'd fix it up and use it if I was you. Once you get that thing working/cleaned up you could sell it for a decent price if you don't need it.
 

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Be aware that the copper "wire" is actually a gas or oil filled hollow tube. If it gets damaged, the thermostat will no longer function.
 

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I had one just like it given to me. I have cleaned stainless steel tank up, elbow grease, Coment, hot water, etc. THe heater in mine is very similar to a hot water tank heater. Most use 220VAC but I simply connected 115VAC to reduce the power output - make sure the tank is grounded.

Can you provide a photograph of hte motor mount? Mine was missing a motor and mount.

This device does not seem suitable for making creamed honey by the Dyce method and likely relies on the "constant stirring method" that many use. I intend to now use it for making Fall 2:1 syrup, maybe a honey storage/ bottling tank (keeps honey warm). I f I can find a way of cooling the container of honey rapidly I could perform the Dyce process to make creamed honey that will never ferment (assuming a hermitic seal on the containers).
 

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This is an old Kelley "Double Boiler". They made them in both 40 and 80 gallon sizes. I have an old 40 gallon that I bought used in the 1980's and I suspect it was made in the early '70's. The stirring attachment was an additional option and wasn't intended for making creamed honey. It was just to slowly stir the honey while it was warming. I don't use mine for honey anymore but it works great for mixing sugar syrup and I stir it by hand with a long handled paddle. I replaced the original heater with one from Dadant...screwed right into the 1" fitting and there's no capillary tube to mess with.

The seams on these old tanks are soldered rather than welded and I've always wondered if the older ones were possibly made with lead based solder.
 

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SWM "The seams on these old tanks are soldered rather than welded and I've always wondered if the older ones were possibly made with lead based solder."

I did a little exploring on the subject of the joint solder. I have no leaks and no obvious acidic corrosion. Based on this comment and the quality of the unit I think it is tin- silver solder:

"A range of tin-silver solders is recommended for stainless steels, since they offer greater strength than the tin-lead solders, coupled with high ductility. Their corrosion resistance is also superior. The appropriate solder should be selected for the expected service conditions."

An alternate solution, if doubtful, is to epoxy coat the joint as the best recommendation.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you everyone. I'm in the middle of a move to Maine to expand my Apiary. When I get there I'll come back to this thread and respond to everyone. Be about a month or so. I'll get more and better pictures too.

Thanks!

One more question, the extractor and this tank haven't been used in years and have a slight film of honey and dust dried onto them inside. What is the best way to clean them? When cleaning the extractor, do I need to take everything out of the inside to be able to clean it properly?
 
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