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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ran into my local bee inspector yesterday. He told me statewide colony loss has been 49% in Ohio this year. I was surprised. I lost one hive so far.

Tom
 

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It has been bad and many hives die this time of year as the cold continues and people don't ensure the bees have adequate feed. Also queenless hives that appear strong and have not yet been inspected will die adding to the toll.
 

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I've heard lots of people loosing 50-90% in Ohio. Many of them experienced beekeepers with lots of hives. It simply was a much colder and consistently cold winter. Good healthy hives mostly made it just fine, but hives with any issues died even though they would have made it in any ordinary year. It didn't help that the fall was poor with a good amount of robbing.

It's not over yet either. It is important to check them asap to make sure they have enough stores as they will start using them very quickly as it finally warms up. In parts of Ohio we haven't even seen maples bloom yet (they are running 2 weeks late) and hives are only starting to build up.

It was a rough year to go treatment free. On the plus side selecting what hives should be used for breeding will be very easy.
 

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I've been hearing 40% loss. And it's still pretty early. I'm at 10%, though.
 

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Last I heard, losses were anticipated to be higher than in the past. As a percentage, my loss of 67% sounds bad, but that is a loss of 2 out of 3. I'll be interested to know how the losses go overall, when many colonies are included in the count.
 

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I think Ohio may experience a much higher number of late winter losses this year attributable to starvation. I lifted up my hives at the end of last month and they were very light. They went into winter well provisioned but burned through their stores much faster than anticipated. Sugar blocks were added a couple of weeks ago, and that seems to be keeping them all going for now.

Tim ... your queens are doing great. :thumbsup:
 

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First year and both hives have survived so far.
Put sugar and pollen substitute on both hives.
Hoping to do quality inspections when the weather gets better.
 

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FWIW similar numbers being reported across the line in IN. I was up at Dadant in MI last week and he was hearing similar numbers from his customers. One guy with 400+ hives lost 85%. Most of the people I have talked to locally are in the 50% range. Agree with Tim, strong, healthy hives are probably ok, but 2013 was not a great year and if the hives were only prepared for an average winter and had any kind of a burp they likely didn't make it. Checked on mine last Friday during our 1 day above 50 and added sugar and pollen patties so that IF it ever does warm up they will have something to work on. Some clusters were pretty small.
 

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My hives were nucs with new queens and we took no honey.
Both appear strong and have capped honey.
Hope to make a nuc or two this year and harvest honey.
 

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This is my first year over wintering hives successfully 'Local bees this year instead of ones from Georgia' and have 6 hives. I just checked them a few days ago and all of them are doing great. 5 frames of bees at minimum on them and some of them are up to 8 frames full. They are starting to bring in pollen and are ramping up brood production. I did not touch there fall honey and they went into winter with 10 full frames up top and combined they would have probably had 3 on the bottom. I feel like the biggest problem was everyone taking honey from them anticipating a easier winter. They have ate most of the honey in my bigger hives and after they get built up again they will probably be getting close to empty.
 

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Out of 6 production hives and 2 nucs I lost 1 production hive in February, I have a pretty good idea that it was the high and low temperature swings which caused the dead out. After losing the 1 hive I went out and wrapped the others with blankets and then wrapped them with tarps, I believe this evened out the temperature swings inside the hives and gave them a fighting chance. I slid the 2 nucs together and wrapped them in a moving blanket to share heat and they have survived as well, the nucs are in the far left of the picture. All the hives are doing well now and gaining strength.

These hives have no wind break and were exposed to very cold high winds which was taking its toll on them, next year I will be looking into insulation wraps.


The hives after wrapping in blankets and tarps.
 

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I know of several at 60%+ I know I am at the 60 %. I know fall really hurt me.
David
 

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99.8% that was not shaken, is dead. .2% isn't worth talking about. All brood boxes was bone dry and had small dead clusters. Last years fall forge was the worst I've seen in over 20 years. Heading south this weekend to pick up a load of packages. Talk to two other comm. beekeepers and there #'s was at 85% loss.
 

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I ran into my local bee inspector yesterday. He told me statewide colony loss has been 49% in Ohio this year. I was surprised. I lost one hive so far.

Tom
Your local bee inspector? That would be your County Apiary Inspector, right? I'm surprised he knows already. The count will rise before it's all done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Your local bee inspector? That would be your County Apiary Inspector, right? I'm surprised he knows already. The count will rise before it's all done.
Mark,

I was assuming that was current reports and the number will increase.

I was trying to give him a little anonimity since he isn't online.

Tom
 

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I wasn't asking for his name. Just clarifying whether you meant the County Inspector or the State Inspector in charge of your area of the State.
 

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Ours are country inspector. Working for the state. But paid by the country. Mine does four or five. In fact I bought out most of what he had. About to retire and the state keeps begging that he stay on. As I understand it.
David
 
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