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Discussion Starter #1
Today, I was enjoying the day until I opened up my of my hives and before I knew it, there were hundreds of stingers in my gloves and so many were stinging my jacket (I got mine from Magnet-Man -- I was saved by its wonderful construction).

I finally had to admit defeat and retreated back to the safety of my vehicle. I was actually concerned that if there were any individuals that might be walking towards me that they would have gotten massively stung.

So, I am taking steps to say goodbye and good riddance to the occupants of hive # 25. I don't mind some hotness in my bees, but meanness never.
 

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Is this one of the ones that recently swarmed, or that you stopped up in the middle of swarming?

If they are queenless from a swarm they are going to be a bit hot, granted they shouldn't be THAT hot.

If you can give them some time, I'd recommend requeening them instead of completely destroying the colony.

Also, do you smoke or not?
 

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most of the time there is a reason PA...look for it before you decide you need to send them to me...LOL
 

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What was the temp? Was it cloudy/rainy? Has it been cloudy/rainy for several days? Could someone or something disturbed them real recently?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I keep a two foot fence around my yards to keep the bothersome creatures out. They are sitting on 4 concrete blocks -- 16 inches from the ground.

Today, it was 85 and it was humid. This was not the hive that I stopped from swarming -- Those bees were gentle in their own way. These were downright nasty. I can't imagine working a hive at full strength come August.

I did see swarm cells and it is possible that the Empress of Hades skipped town with half of her minions. I seem to remember alot more bees going into the hive a week or so ago.

Devdog, I would have to really hate you if I shipped these bees your way. But then I would have to answer to God and I don't think I could justify it even just a little. lol

I keep thinking what can I do with all that brood. Then I think of the danger that I expose others to. I really only have one choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I will be destroying the queen cells, but there is alot of brood coming my way. That means that these "nasty girls to be" will be around for another 40 days -- Way too long.

You can't imagine what my leather gloves looked like -- Reminds you of a five tiered cactus with all those bee stings that they left behind. I can only wonder how many were stinging my jacket.

Oh yes, I did smoke them.

Tonight, I did need to tiptoe back to this beeyard at dusk to deliver some nucs to it from other yards and that hive was roaring.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I got 15 packages last year that came from Louisiana - That is all that I know. I am not sure where their queens came from. I had thought that the bees were hot last year as these were my first packages. I did alot of splits last year in order to increase my number of hives and I gave them them new queens.

It is just amazing that I can have two hives side by side, where the bees are hot in one and gentle in the other.

I still have one additional hive to check for swarm cells that was somewhat hot last year, when I moved it to another yard, but it was smaller in strength than what it is now.
 

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We had thunderstorms in the area all day yesterday. From experience, bees hate storms! And, some of them seem to be much more in tune with them then others. Check the hive again when the weather is better. We opted out of check on the queens for newly installed packages yesterday due to the weather.
 

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mine will get that way once and a while. I just try again a few days later...and they have generally settled down!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Everyone, I know how you feel because I feel the same way. Try to save the Hive -- Regardless how you slice the bread, the genetics within this hive are bad.

I do understand how weather can affect bees. I was working hives within the same yard and no other hive reacted in such a manner. So, it isn't the weather and varmints are not affecting the hive.

It is possible that they are queenless as an earlier swarm may have taken place.

I am thinking of dividing the hive just to demoralize the bees and then going in and destroying all queen cells and recombining them so that all they can do is make honey and letting them die out naturally. What are your thoughts on that?
 

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That would still take a while. If you are willing to wait, there are other options. It sounds like they are out of control. I would pull the brood and disperse it to boost other hives. One frame per hive. With the bees left over, requeen or dispose of them. I have out yards for this purpose. Keep them away from your other stock, as the heat is contagious.
 

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Another option would be to split into nucs only 1 1/2 -2 frames of brood to the nuc, this would likely make them all small enough that they would not be so aggressive. Add queens from a different source.

I would not think that you had made a bad decision if you kill them, that is a decision that only you can make and we certainly don't have the situation or liability to be in a position to be critical of that choice.
 

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So, If one does decide to kill off a hive, what is the best way to do it? Since you still want to reuse all resorces?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Why not take the bees and combine them with different hives. They might calm down them.
I would love to do that, but I don't want to work those bees coming from the brood and there are tons of brood.

The best thing that I can think of is to turn them into honeymakers for the nectar flow and let nature take its course. The interesting thing is that they completed a shallow super and when I came back in the evening, the girls abandoned it and had flown back to their hive, which allowed me to collect the super.
 
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