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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2-week-old hive is causing me (a newbee) to lose sleep for worry about bears. I finally got materials for an electric fence and realized that the fence should (always) come before what is inside it. Now I have to pound posts into ground that is largely shale, a few feet away from the hive. I imagine the bees will hate all this noise and vibration. Can I move their hive out of the construction zone for the day, and if so, how?
 

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try using cement bolts in the ground. drill holes in the shale put the bolts in use a L bracket and bolt the post to the bracket. if that works for you.
 

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Or concrete blocks filled w/ cement. Stand the post in one of the holes first. You won't be able to after the cement is set up.
 

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There are push in posts you can get just about anywhere they sell the fencing.
Not nearly as cheap as wood posts (that you cut) but are fast and no hammering. I imagine you got a nice strong zapper with 3 or 4 rods to take care of bears?

Miike
 

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Do it early morning or late evening when it is cool and they are back in the hive. I have put up a number of fences around the hives with no problems and no protection. They may peak out the entrance to see what's going on but won't (shouldn't) bother you.
 

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My 2-week-old hive is causing me (a newbee) to lose sleep for worry about bears. I finally got materials for an electric fence and realized that the fence should (always) come before what is inside it. Now I have to pound posts into ground that is largely shale, a few feet away from the hive. I imagine the bees will hate all this noise and vibration. Can I move their hive out of the construction zone for the day, and if so, how?
Where did you buy the fence? Thanks
 

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Strap the hive together (at least 2 straps); close them in at night and move them 2 miles for the time. Leave it strapped; reverse the procedure when done. Leave yourself some room behind the hives. I use a woven mesh. 1 steel post every 20 ft or so and push in supports in between. Try Premier for the fence. Save money on the energizer at Tractor Supply. bBTW, great idea on pouring cement in a cement block. I suppose one could use a big flue section for more stability. Oh yes, Staple some bacon to the wire when you get set up. The first zap should be a good one. Rub peanut butter on the wire. If it's dry, a woven wire steel section of fence flat on the ground and grounded will insure this.

Dickm
 

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Bears aren't always attracted to honey. Bee's aren't always bothered by pounding. I'd try pounding in the posts first before you get busy with closing them up or moving them.
 

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If shallow shale, you may be better off using some 5 gallon buckets or old tires and concreting some T posts into them, that way you can expand if needed, move if needed. You dont really need the posts to be any stronger to hold wire since its not fencing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@Adrianthomp: got all materials at Tractor Supply, which I would not recommend, but everything we wanted was backordered at Premier.

Doing it tomorrow; going to try to pound in the posts, but if it fails, will definitely try the cement-in-cinderblocks method. Bears won't just plow though it in disregard of or panic because of shocks?
 

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There are push in posts you can get just about anywhere they sell the fencing.
Not nearly as cheap as wood posts (that you cut) but are fast and no hammering. I imagine you got a nice strong zapper with 3 or 4 rods to take care of bears?

Miike
Just found out about these too! I put up an electric fence around my garden and the hubby found those at Orshlen's. WAY cheaper than using our $5 steel T-posts!!! and MUCH quicker. Easy to put up, easy to take down.:D Worked perfect with my new solar charger too!
 

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Just found out about these too! I put up an electric fence around my garden and the hubby found those at Orshlen's. WAY cheaper than using our $5 steel T-posts!!! and MUCH quicker. Easy to put up, easy to take down.:D Worked perfect with my new solar charger too!
What was the cost?
 

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The trick to eliminating any "panicking and running ahead through the fence" is to use ribbon wire they can easily see, day or night. Instead of walking through it, getting jolted halfway and bolting, they will see it, stop and sniff. One "sniff" on that sensitive nose and you have yourself an educated bear.

For those considering putting the posts in cement filled cinder blocks, tires, pails etc, I would make very certain no part of the foundation is accessible to the bear. A bear can figure out to pull the foundation, bringing down the fence.

Sheri
 

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Personally I use reninforcing rod .5" or 5/8 3' min 40"+ better
[ probably not 5/8, too big for flower]
[2nd edit probably rebar cant' be pounded into shale so...drill?]
Cheap enough at scrap yrd. The 'flowers' (insulators) do cost something,
but they seem to last so long you forget how much
Use a small sledge to pound in, rather than a hammer
Vise grip to remove easily.
The bear (or something else)may bend rebar, but can be rougly restraigtened in ground
I use white line for visability
Keeping clear of "leaks" is key, keep trimmed, check flowers

dave
 
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