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I’m a newbee and I hived two packages yesterday. I’m using eight frame mediums and foundationless frames.

I was thinking crushed bees = getting stung, so I aimed for zero bees crushed by equipment. I went slow and eased the frames back into place. It was super slo-o-o-ow because the sides of the boxes were covered thickly with bees. I wonder if foundationless beekeeping makes this step more intense - I think bees dumped into a hive half-full of frames and foundation might find somewhere to be besides the frame-rest because there are many more vertical surfaces in the hive.

The first package I tried to open would not let go of its feed can. I could get it almost out but the bottom rim of the can would not come through. I think the hole was cut too small. I skipped to the second package and got the can out easily. I ended up prying the screen off one side of the other package.

I decided to go for top entrances - I have chickens and don’t want them snacking on landing bees if they sneak into the bee yard. I decided this after I bought telescoping covers and inner covers. Awkward. Here’s how I’ve made it work: I shimmed the inner cover to create an entrance and used a sugar-feeding rim ($4 from Kelley’s) between the telescoping and inner covers to avoid telescoping right over the entrance. I paired two more shims to make an entrance reducer. This setup is fiddly and will probably be replaced with something simpler, but it got me started. It has a nice spot for a baggie of syrup, too.
 

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Hey, are you calling me a geek? ;)

I've read everything, now I have to actually do. It's hard to make that transition - but it's definitely interesting.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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> I was thinking crushed bees = getting stung, so I aimed for zero bees crushed by equipment. I went slow and eased the frames back into place. It was super slo-o-o-ow because the sides of the boxes were covered thickly with bees. I wonder if foundationless beekeeping makes this step more intense - I think bees dumped into a hive half-full of frames and foundation might find somewhere to be besides the frame-rest because there are many more vertical surfaces in the hive.

No. Any package install has bees crawling everywhere. In a foundationless hive they are more holding on to each other than the foundation, but all in all it's the same number on the sides and the rests etc.

> The first package I tried to open would not let go of its feed can.

Normal. To remove bees, stop trying to be gentle...

> I could get it almost out but the bottom rim of the can would not come through. I think the hole was cut too small.

Normal. Just get a death grip on it.

> I skipped to the second package and got the can out easily. I ended up prying the screen off one side of the other package.

That works too.

> I decided to go for top entrances - I have chickens and don’t want them snacking on landing bees if they sneak into the bee yard. I decided this after I bought telescoping covers and inner covers. Awkward. Here’s how I’ve made it work: I shimmed the inner cover to create an entrance and used a sugar-feeding rim ($4 from Kelley’s) between the telescoping and inner covers to avoid telescoping right over the entrance. I paired two more shims to make an entrance reducer. This setup is fiddly and will probably be replaced with something simpler, but it got me started. It has a nice spot for a baggie of syrup, too.

That should work well. I've done similar but with a whole box. You still should screen the hole in the inner cover so they don't get in your sugar-feeding rim and build comb.
 
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