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I had brought an observation hive back to my home in September, from a market. This O.H. was on the verge of starvation. They were packed in the top frame and covered about one frame in total bees.

They have been raising brood for the past several weeks. During this time, the queen never left the brood area. It has been shrinking in size, and they have been packing in the nectar. All the stored pollen that had not been used immediately for larvae was stored down in the second frame. Well away from the brood and the bee cluster.

The last of the brood had emerged as the queen has stopped laying for a few weeks now. The top brood area is all but filled in with honey. The bottom frame is half capped and has alot of unripened nectar. They have been clearing an area in the center for the eventual queens migration to the bottom frame.

Last night, she made the move. The cluster has reassmbled on the lower frame. I know this is the same story that has been repeated many times over in the hive. But its actually amazing to see. To just wonder that the bees for two months now have been storing pollen in an area away from the cluster, and always knowing where to put it, and what was going to happen.

Nothing in break through observations I know. Nothing new to report. Really amazing to see it happen just the same. I have had an observation before, but did not keep track of happenings on a daily basis.

I think advising new beekeepers to get an observation hive should be just the same as telling them they should have two hives instead of one. The knowledge and understanding of the hives internal workings could never be explained the same as actually seeing it happen.

Get an observation hive. You will not be sorry!
 

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"Get an observation hive. You will not be sorry!"

I second that. It was one of the best tools
for learning I have gotten. You learn so much
about flows, brood cycles, etc.
 

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I noticed yesterday evening that only a dozen or so capped cells are remaining in our "Bee TV", the queen has shut down, I concur that the observation hive is a fantastic teaching device.
 

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Bjorn, you have no idea what your post meant to me. I got my first hive this past July, and have been muddling along, and this is my first winter. I was concerned because all the bees seem to have abandoned the lowest super, and were clustered in the next one up. When I added a super of extracted frames, they did not move it down, they moved up into it. So I was heading into winter with 3 deeps, thinking the lowest had been abandoned. Your observations, although perhaps not directly relevant to an outdoor hive in PA, give me a good feeling about the health of my hive. Thank you!

[ November 16, 2006, 07:22 PM: Message edited by: Hobie ]
 

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Observation hives are also great teaching devices for schools, they will captivate even the most active children. I always get a kick when I remove the cover and always get a loud Woo!! From the whole class or gymnasium full of kids. Then the questions start to fly, or should I say Buzz. ;)
 
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