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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems like I have read a lot of comments that suggest there may be problems using OAV late in the fall when temperatures are in the 40s. Is there some problem using OAV when the bees are loosely clustered - still a few bees venturing out during the warmest part of some days?

I did a full OAV treatment starting in August - every four days, six applications.

Recently I have seen a few more dead or crawling bees outside the hives than I would like to see. I would like to hit them with OAV another time or two. Is there any concern about that?

I am in the Portland Oregon area.
 

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The temperature inside the hive is the controlling factor in whether or not the bees will be clustered. We are having nights below freezing and my bees, with only top insulation are not clustered. You could wait till a bit later in the day and give a few shots of smoke to stir them up a bit if you had any doubt.
 

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Right now,one hive consisting of two 10 frame deeps of an Ohio swarm of muttsutts.
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Glad I ran across this topic. This my first year with bees, I am planning on doing the OAV in late November or earlier December. Supposedly, no brood. I am in Northeast , Ohio. I do have a BEE Cozy wrap on my hive now because some of our days are getting colder but with an occasional 60* plus day that sneaks in on us. Are there any dangers of doing the OAV with the wand that you stick through the front lower entrance? What should the outside temps be etc. ? I worry that if the bees are to close to the bottom, I'd likely burn their little butts with the hot vapor.
 

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When I was using the wand heaters I found that a few good shots of smoke in the entrance resulted in fewer crispy bees in the bowl. The bee cozy wrap does help, but not near as much as considerably high R value insulation on top. I think I have seen mention in Etienne's literature 60% of heat loss is through the hive top. Foam board under top cover and an extra layer can easily go on top. Various ways of keeping the elements away from the external piece.
 

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Glad I ran across this topic. This my first year with bees, I am planning on doing the OAV in late November or earlier December. Supposedly, no brood. I am in Northeast , Ohio. I do have a BEE Cozy wrap on my hive now because some of our days are getting colder but with an occasional 60* plus day that sneaks in on us. Are there any dangers of doing the OAV with the wand that you stick through the front lower entrance? What should the outside temps be etc. ? I worry that if the bees are to close to the bottom, I'd likely burn their little butts with the hot vapor.
The wand type vaporizers are not too great. I would purchase a band heater vaporizer, it's the superior OAV application method, anyone who uses OAV would be crazy not to switch to a band heater.

If you go to "for sale" there's one for $200, or Lorob Bees sells them for $300.
 

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Right now,one hive consisting of two 10 frame deeps of an Ohio swarm of muttsutts.
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When I was using the wand heaters I found that a few good shots of smoke in the entrance resulted in fewer crispy bees in the bowl. The bee cozy wrap does help, but not near as much as considerably high R value insulation on top. I think I have seen mention in Etienne's literature 60% of heat loss is through the hive top. Foam board under top cover and an extra layer can easily go on top. Various ways of keeping the elements away from the external piece.
I plan on topping off my hive with a Hot Box ( Quilt Box) from Kelley Beekeeping, when it gets pretty cold but after I do the OAV treatment because I worry also about the vapors going up and into the top insulation that the hot box provides. Not sure if that is a good idea or not.
 

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The wand type vaporizers are not too great. I would purchase a band heater vaporizer, it's the superior OAV application method, anyone who uses OAV would be crazy not to switch to a band heater.

If you go to "for sale" there's one for $200, or Lorob Bees sells them for $300.
I went over to sales like you said to do. I even checked out his videos. I like what I see but I am already invested $175 in the wand type and haven't even used it yet. With the band type,I'd also have to invest in another generator to power it since my very old generator kicked the bucket and went south on me a year ago. They aren't cheap anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone. It sounds like there’s nothing to worry about using OAV any time of year.

I should say that my bees are probably not clustered - more like they are just staying inside most of the time.

Even if they were clustered, I would think that OAV would still permeate the ball. Am I wrong about that?
 

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the band heater vaporizers just run an extension chord, no big deal, no battery or generator needed.

Get a 500 watt inverter stick it on your car battery with it on, easy.

Home depot sells them for like $50.

I'd return the wand vaporizer or sell it on ebay, and get yourself a band heater.
 

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Thanks everyone. It sounds like there’s nothing to worry about using OAV any time of year.

I should say that my bees are probably not clustered - more like they are just staying inside most of the time.

Even if they were clustered, I would think that OAV would still permeate the ball. Am I wrong about that?
That would be overstating the case I think. Not recommended if tightly clustered. That would depend on population and whether any insulation beyond bare wood of hive.
 

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The wand type vaporizers are not too great. I would purchase a band heater vaporizer, it's the superior OAV application method, anyone who uses OAV would be crazy not to switch to a band heater.
Other than speed and reduced chance of frying some bees using the wand style, what are the advantages that make the band heater superior?
 

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Wil, there is nothing wrong with the wand type vaporizers
I used them for years until I got an Easyvap.

They do take longer, but the wand will put a lot of vapor into the hive. The important consideration is that they kill mites.

Having said that, I was using 2 wands at once and it still took too long. Too many hives, in 3 locations....

If you have a couple hives or so, don't worry.
 

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It seems like I have read a lot of comments that suggest there may be problems using OAV late in the fall when temperatures are in the 40s. Is there some problem using OAV when the bees are loosely clustered - still a few bees venturing out during the warmest part of some days?

I did a full OAV treatment starting in August - every four days, six applications.

Recently I have seen a few more dead or crawling bees outside the hives than I would like to see. I would like to hit them with OAV another time or two. Is there any concern about that?

I am in the Portland Oregon area.

What is the outside temperature range to perform OAV?
You need an outside temperature of 37 (f). There is no top temperature. The temperature of 37 f is only needed at time of treatment and 1-2 hours thereafter.
 

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We discussed this last winter. The temperature affects the tightness of the cluster. Below 37F it's so tight the OAV can't get into the middle and the mites are not affected.

The puff of smoke suggestion is a good one, it tends to loosen them up a bit - but 45F-50F is better.
 
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