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I have never seen honey bees on an oak tree. It is covered in bees, so much so that i noticed it by the buzzing when i stood underneath it. What I have read is that it may be related to aphids, but I don't see any aphids and they seem to be attracted to the tiny acorns. There are other sources in bloom now including dandelions and white clover, but this water oak is covered with bees. Has anyone else seen this?
 

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Interesting. Never heard of that one. Read that it grows in Southern California and Baja. Since you spit out the Latin, you probably know more than I do, so I will concede.
It could be a Water Oak (Quercus *****)as well, both have Mono lobal leave. Although each has differences in the leaves I cannot see in the picture. The main difference is the water oak develops a larger, wider acorn with stripes a shallow cuplet cap, that should be mature at this time of year as they pollinate in February and take 18 months to mature. As where the Engelmann Oak's acorn remains shrouded and mature in October. Although the Endelmann is Native only to San Diego County in the us. It has been transplanted to other states and many states south of the Masson Dixon report populations. Now it is posable that the picture is of a water oak that for some reason has undeveloped acorns. Maybe all the rain the east has been reported maybe some other environmental reason.

Could be either, no need to concede, Just expanding Possibilities. :scratch:
 

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Interesting. Never heard of that one. Read that it grows in Southern California and Baja. Since you spit out the Latin, you probably know more than I do, so I will concede.
It could be a Water Oak (Quercus *****)as well, both have Mono lobal leave. Although each has differences in the leaves I cannot see in the picture. The main difference is the water oak develops a larger, wider acorn with stripes a shallow cuplet cap, that should be mature at this time of year as they pollinate in February and take 18 months to mature. As where the Engelmann Oak's acorn remains shrouded and mature in October. Although the Endelmann is Native only to San Diego County in the us. It has been transplanted to other states and many states south of the Masson Dixon report populations. Now it is posable that the picture is of a water oak that for some reason has undeveloped acorns. Maybe all the rain the east has been reported maybe some other environmental reason.

Could be either, no need to concede, Just expanding Possibilities.
Thanks for the information. I’m a wetland engineer that works with biologists all day. I know enough about tree and plant ID to get myself into trouble and that’s about it!
 
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