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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I sampled throughout my yard these days and found out that I have a medium of 2-3% varroa infestation. At the same time we are fast approaching the broodless period in my area. The bees are backfilling in most of the hives. I decided to skip the late summer treatments, wait for "broodless" and use OA dribble as single treatment for this year.
I haven't used any kind of treatments during Spring either.

Does anyone successfully apply this treatment schema - one OA dribble in late Autumn? (without having virus issues)
 

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A lot of beekeepers do this here in Germany. Adapted treatment, so treatments only when necessary. Most of them leave out summer treatments, but do the winter treatment.

With great success all the brood is removed in July (end of flow here), put into a seperated apiary where the brood combs get treated while the brood emerges and one flash treatment formic acid when all the brood emerged at the end. The original hives do not get treated but in winter. With the brood a lot of diseases and pesticides get removed out of the hives just before the winterbees are raised. Winterbees also do not experience a treatment and usually those hives go into winter in a good shape.
 

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I sampled throughout my yard these days and found out that I have a medium of 2-3% varroa infestation. At the same time we are fast approaching the broodless period in my area. The bees are backfilling in most of the hives. I decided to skip the late summer treatments, wait for "broodless" and use OA dribble as single treatment for this year.
I haven't used any kind of treatments during Spring either.

Does anyone successfully apply this treatment schema - one OA dribble in late Autumn? (without having virus issues)
I do--but with a BIG proviso--all of my queens are VSH stock. While they came from several sources, all those sources obtained their II queens from the same place--Adam Finkelstein of VP Queens. I started using VSH queens last year and had such good results I did not treat at all. This year I added more VSH queens by doing splits, again with excellent results. I've done sugar shakes every month and the highest count I had was 2 mites from one hive. Nonetheless I plan on doing an OA dribble in about November--as soon as the hives are broodless or nearly so. These are all 1st and 2nd year hives.

Because of the VSH factor, I don't know if this is helpful to you at all, but I thought I'd mention it. I also use a feeding plan very similar to Lauri Miller's and feel that is a big factor as well. I see a dramatic improvement in my hives since I started feeding this way and feel that strong, healthy bees are better able to withstand with whatever conditions the hive has to handle.

HTH

Rusty
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No VSH queens available in my country. I have to do them on my own if posible with all the treating yards around me. It might be that a "feature" of carpathian bee combined with some locality factors could permit such a treatment schema without getting weak colonies in Spring. I don't know it yet though but I will found out in time.

The only chance that people would turned their attention to TF is amitraz resistant mites :D but I maybe wrong even in that case. People are very skeptic.

Thanks.
 
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