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Watched a presentation from a researcher at Penn State through my bee club today. They took package bees with known varroa and did OA dribble, vapor and spray during install. While all three methods help reduce varroa and there was little difference in build-up between the treated hives and the non treated control hives, when honey was pulled in August the control hives produced almost twice as much honey as the treated hives. Has anyone else noticed this? They did not do a follow-up to try and find out why this happened, it was just what they observed.
 

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when honey was pulled in August the control hives produced almost twice as much honey as the treated hives.
That's hard to believe.

They did not do a follow-up to try and find out why this happened,
Which is in itself suspicious ...

Without documented details of the procedure, this can only be considered as hearsay.
LJ
 

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Yes I also recently read of a project where OA and brood breaks were tested against Apivar and the results were that the OA and brood break hives ended up weaker than the Apivar hives, wow I wonder if the Apivar hives also had forced brood breaks? I should imagine that the hives with a 14 day forced brood break would be at least a thousand eggs a day behind the other hives not to mention the damage to the queen by forcing her into a position where she has to stop laying. So what were these researches telling us for years and years, oh yes varoa lives off of bees haemolymph
 

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Yes I also recently read of a project where OA and brood breaks were tested against Apivar and the results were that the OA and brood break hives ended up weaker than the Apivar hives, wow I wonder if the Apivar hives also had forced brood breaks? I should imagine that the hives with a 14 day forced brood break would be at least a thousand eggs a day behind the other hives not to mention the damage to the queen by forcing her into a position where she has to stop laying. So what were these researches telling us for years and years, oh yes varoa lives off of bees haemolymph
Well said johno. :thumbsup:
 

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Sounds like bit of a game of telephone on DR Underwoods COMB study in PA

https://youtu.be/ZW3-xL7ZG_Y?t=595

The "Feral Survivor Stock" used in all 3 setups swarmed like mad (90%) and I would suspect a few of the CF didn't swam do to being weak, but still ended up being stronger then swarmed hives during the main flow and made more honey

end of the 2019 year averages were" 30 lb. in the CF group, 22 lb. in the CON group, and 27 lb. in the ORG group, totalling 630, 1506, and 1701 lb., respectively" and they felt the differences weren't significant. even after splitting they were unable to recover the CF hive count after massive 1st winter losses and went in to winter 2019/2020 with 42 CF, 87 CON, and 89 ORG.
 

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IDK - but I got 100% overwinter survival from OAV.

That's going to make quite a bit more honey than the typical 25% + losses.
 

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If I don't die from the coronavirus, I will try to remember to post and update in 4 years.
 
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