Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The NYS Apiary Inspection Program will not be funded this year, unless people influence their Legislature Reps to fund it.

If this is important to you, contact your State Senator and Representative.

I, for one, will not be doing so. But I told a friend of mine that I would pass this along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,290 Posts
The NYS Apiary Inspection Program will not be funded this year, unless people influence their Legislature Reps to fund it.

If this is important to you, contact your State Senator and Representative.

I, for one, will not be doing so. But I told a friend of mine that I would pass this along.
Why not Mark? An inspection service isn't an inherintly bad thing, is it? I do appreciate the inspectors keeping tabs on the level of disease in my area. Not using antibiotics, I do like to know what's around.

Side note: My wife wanted me to apply for Cappy's job when first posted. Wouldn't even consider it...would have to sell my bees, live in Albany, and wear a tie..., I don't even own a tie. :) Now what's Paul going to do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
I have already written to both Commissioner Hooker and Governor Paterson stating my support for their efforts to balance the budget and to stop squandering taxpayers' money on programs we neither need nor want. The Apiary Inspection Program has been mismanaged for decades and I think any effort to prevent its demise is futile.

Most beekeepers support the program as it COULD BE, not as it is. But frankly, what this program could be ain't ever going to happen. They have rejected suggestions to modernize and re-focus their efforts and have insisted on squandering the public's money and trust on an ineffectual program that produces very little bang for the buck.

In my opinion the time has come to shift focus to a privately run technology transfer program modeled after the Ontario Province model. Dr. Marla Spivak presented a similar proposal at the ABF nation conference in Orlando, suggesting the need for something like this on a national scale.

Most government agencies are too expensive, too inflexible, and too narrowly focused to be of consistent assistance with real world problems. We have to stop expecting them to solve our problems.

There isn't enough money to go around in any case. I would rather see the money go to schools and health care than use it to fund a bunch of semi-qualified bee inspectors poking around private property looking for trouble.

NYS spends $200,000 a year to find a hundred or so hives with AFB. That's $2000 per hive. Why is it so high? The government can't do anything cost effectively. They overlay ever single useful action with expensive layers of bureaucracy. I know what I am talking about, I worked for NYS.

In some countries, beekeepers are compensated for AFB hives. They find them themselves, identify them and report them. A program like this costs one tenth as much what we have. Pooling our resources for a compensation fund is one way to go (strict rules would be put in place to prevent abuse). If even 1000 NYS beekeepers pitched in $10, there would be enough money for it.

Realistically, this is something WE have to make happen. Nobody is going to do it for us.

* * *

The Ontario Beekeepers’ Association (OBA), Technology Transfer Program (TTP) was established in the early 1990’s by Dr. Medhat Nasr. The mandate of the TTP is to conduct research for Ontario’s beekeeping industry, to facilitate a honey bee breeding program in Ontario and to transfer information, skills and methodologies to the beekeepers.

The OBA Tech-Transfer Program is unique because it operates directly for the beekeepers of Ontario, focusing on issues which are of importance to them. Base funding is received from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. The beekeepers also donate funds for research, however; additional funding is sought from agencies such as the Agricultural Adaptation Council. The focus is Integrated Pest Management. A large component of this is the breeding program. Tech-Transfer works individually with the bee breeders to assist them with their stock selection. They also test a variety of treatments for the control of varroa mites. The goal is to be pro-active and to limit the number of treatments that must be applied to the bee hive each year.

The current TTP research team members, Janet Tam, Melanie Kempers and Sarah Ayton, are based in Guelph. Collaborators include the Provincial Apiarist, the University of Guelph and co-operating beekeepers.

Educational, hands-on workshops are held every year regarding introductory beekeeping, integrated pest management in beekeeping and introductory queen rearing.

The results of the work conducted by the OBA TTP is presented at the annual OBA meetings, to local beekeepers associations within Ontario, to other beekeeper associations in Canada and the US, and to school and community groups with an interest in honey bees.


* * *

Peter Loring Borst
Ithaca, NY USA
peterloringborst.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I've had mixed results with the NYS Bee Inspectors over the years. The past few years have been good for me. I live in an area that's had a fair amount of foulbrood. The bee inspector is the only thing around here that's keeping it under control at the present time. People get bees and then they lose interest and then the bees get foulbrood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Why not Mark? An inspection service isn't an inherintly bad thing, is it? I do appreciate the inspectors keeping tabs on the level of disease in my area. Not using antibiotics, I do like to know what's around.

Side note: My wife wanted me to apply for Cappy's job when first posted. Wouldn't even consider it...would have to sell my bees, live in Albany, and wear a tie..., I don't even own a tie. :) Now what's Paul going to do?
What's Paul to do? Continue going to work, I guess. I don't know what he will do at work, but his salary hasn't been cut. As far as i know. I believe that it is a line item in the Ag&Mkts budget. The $200,000.00 that is being cut covers the salaries of the field inspectors. Expenses, such as mileage, are on top of that.

You are correct, it isn't inherently bad. But what has it done for me lately? And as far as knowing "what's around", did you ever get a report of what was around in your area? Maybe after the season was over, but not during the season.

Last summer Paul Cappy spoke to the ESHPA summer picnic and told us that there was an "outbreak" of AFB somewhere in the Finger Lakes. He didn't say where and he didn't say what he meant by an "outbreak". And I didn't get the impression that he informed beekeepers in the area that there was something to look out for.

Yeah, I can't see you living in Albany either. Maybe your wife should have applied for the job. :)

Say Peter. You have a tie, don't you? I didn't give it much thought. I know my limitations.

Aaron Morris, Peter Borst, a guy from WVA and a guy from Ontario applied, along w/ Mr. Cappy. I've heard it said that it's not what you know, but who you know that gets one ahead in this world. Not to denegrate Paul. But he knew/knows folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,688 Posts
I've had mixed results with the NYS Bee Inspectors over the years.
how will this affect your sar grant, as the bee inspectors are required to test the hives for nosema each year??

Since moving to N.Y I find that neither the inspectors nor the bee organizations that I have joined communicate any, and I mean any information to the beekeepers. I tried for the first 4 years I was here to get inspected, just because in 30 years I had never been inspected, only managed to get two apiaries inspected and the last time waited the better part of two days and the inspector never showed up. I agree with others make the beeks that want it pay for the service, will work alot better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Mark writes:
> Say Peter. You have a tie, don't you? I didn't give it much thought. I know my limitations.

Nope. No ties. I did apply, but knowing that I wouldn't be selected. No tie.
But seriously, I didn't want to live in Albany either. I really just wanted to let people know that there were qualified people out there interested in the program.

I felt that Geoff Wilson was a great candidate. His problem, apparently, was that he had good ideas. I went up and visited him after I heard that he was being interviewed. We talked about using small hand held computers in the field, GPS, etc.

Did you know that one of the inspectors asked for a couple of hundred dollars to buy a GPS unit for his vehicle. They turned him down. A GPS unit would pay for itself in no time what with the savings in route planning. He bought the thing anyway with his own money.

I always used Google Maps to plan my routes, another huge time saver. Not only good for planning but you have an idea what the place looks like before you get there! I'd look for the main house and the two big barns; the bees are about a 1/4 mile back ; )

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Peter, your post #3 above makes such good sense! That, of course, means it isn't likely to happen. :lookout: Which is a shame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
Do you pay to have your hives regeristered? Here we pay like 5 bucks apairie and they will inspect it. Also if you have it registered here your neighbors can't force you into moving your hives.

:eek:t: A guy north of here had some hives. His neighbor started to find little brown specs on his car. One day the neighbor decided to test the little brown specs by sending it to a lab. He found it was bee poo. He didn't want bees pooping on his car. Long story short, the beek had to move his hives and it could have been prevented if he registered his hives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
850 Posts
I've had mixed results with the NYS Bee Inspectors over the years. The past few years have been good for me. I live in an area that's had a fair amount of foulbrood. The bee inspector is the only thing around here that's keeping it under control at the present time. People get bees and then they lose interest and then the bees get foulbrood.
Michael J. will this affect your project?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
What are the guys who move their bees south for winter going to do. Dont they need to be inspected to legally move out of state? Or into another state?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
In regards to my Specialty Crop Grant, it should not have a devastating effect. We would have to get creative and find a different way to get samples taken. The categories in the grant for inspector's hours and transportation would still be there. Paul Cappy is supposed to be the advisor for the grant; he drives by here twice a week on his way to Albany. Maybe this would be a way to test some of Peter's ideas. In California, the almond growers hire their own inspectors. Unfortunately, I probably should have included more money in the grant for inspection.
I still haven't seen a contract from Ag & Markets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,378 Posts
I realize that this post was for NY and I am from PA.

We lost our inspectors this summer as they were laid off. I had in inspector call to check on my bees only to find out that the reason for the lack of followup call was he no longer had his job.

When I called our state and queried how beekeepers who wanted to sell bees could get their bees inspected, I was told that they would accommodate me.
Since I am just growing my business, I didn't quite need them yet. Again, this was for PA and not NY.

But I think that it was foolhardy for them to eliminate the inspections. Someone had mentioned that it cost them $2,000 per hive to find hives with AFB. By destroying those hives, it might have saved countless others from being infected and what is the savings. Who knows, if the AFB hives were close to a large beeyard, the savings could be immense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
$2,000 per hive was cited as the cost of the program by Peter Borst. He also recommended a bounty program in which beekeepers would be paid for turning in diseased hives. Such a program would indemnify the beek for his loss. I think that's a great idea. Part of the reason that an inspection program is so ineffective is that some beeks with the worst problems don't cooperate with the inspectors. It's pretty disheartening when you lay out a bunch of money and then the State burns up all of your equipment. Most of us know people that have given up after such an experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
> Someone had mentioned that it cost them $2,000 per hive to find hives with AFB. By destroying those hives, it might have saved countless others from being infected and what is the savings. Who knows, if the AFB hives were close to a large beeyard, the savings could be immense.

Yes, but should the taxpayers pay for shoddy beekeeper's practices? Is this the most cost effective approach? What about spending the money on the educational component? Outreach was cut from the state budget BEFORE inspection was slated to be cut. What does that tell you?

When I inspected I always tried to make it an educational experience for the beekeeper (and me too). However, one of the NYS inspectors was heard to say that he preferred inspecting when the beekeeper wasn't there because "they ask too many questions".

I think we as a beekeepers can do a whole lot better than that.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top