Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a single hive that is not doing well. I have managed to keep it going for to long probably. Had 3 laying workers, keep adding a partial frame of brood each week, and they have made a few queen cells, but bad luck (the guy keeping them keeps messing with them too much) has caused the last 2 queen cells to be lost.

It has about 2 medium frames of bees in it and about 1/2 frame of brood remaining. Since there are no more open brood, I cut two larva out using a cell punch and added them to the queen cell frame. The larva are about twice cell of an egg or maybe smaller. I could find eggs and then these were the smallest two cells I could find.

Since most the bees are less than 2 weeks old, they have no open larva, there is some pollen bread, a feeder, plus protein patties in the hive, is there enough bees in the hive to raise a successful queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
Kind of hard to follow what your saying. How do you know how many laying workers? You say there is no more open brood but then you say you can find eggs. ??? Eggs are open brood. If you have eggs and you've solved your laying worker problem, hint....eggs will be at bottom of cell and only one egg per cell. If you have that, you have a queen. Once a queen hatches she immediately kills the others and they tear the queen cells down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,652 Posts
Normally, when the queen is ready to emerge from her cell, there is no brood or if there is it's all sealed brood. No open brood is needed in the hive to raise a queen cell. It sounds like you have 2 frames worth of bees and sealed emerging brood, should be good enough to finish up that last queen cell. I hope it emerges for you. They only reason you may want to add more eggs is if that last cell isn't any good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ok I will try to make this clearer.

I have a single hive that is not doing well since last fall. I have managed to keep it going for to long probably. Since then it had 3 laying workers that I have gotten rid of. I have kept adding a partial frame of brood each week over the last 3 or 4 weeks and they made a few queen cells. However I have had bad luck and none of the queen cells survived.

It has about 2 medium frames covered with bees in it and about 1/2 frame of capped brood remaining on the last frame I added. Since there are no more open brood, I cut two larva out from another hive using a cell punch and added them to the queen cell frame. The larva are about twice cell of an egg or maybe smaller. I could find eggs in the hive I pulled the larva from and these larva were the smallest two I could find.

Since most the bees are less than 2 weeks old, the hive has no open larva beside these two, there is some pollen bread in the hive, a feeder, plus protein patties in the hive, is there enough bees in the hive to raise a successful queen?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Djei5 - Sorry about the original post. Sometimes my fingers are not writing what I am thinking. Or at least that is my excuse for poorly worded sentences. :rolleyes:

Ray - Thanks that is what I was hoping. If either of these cell punch do not make it, I will keep trying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,127 Posts
Just being stubborn I let one go for a good 6 weeks. Did add brood to keep it going. Started cells ,never finished, never went laying worker.
Combined and done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
Marshmasterpat, I had a hive last season that I kept adding cells to and frames of brood that had laying workers. I kept thinking that the gorgeous queen cells I was adding were going to be just fine and I was patient. After a few weeks I would check for a queen and if there wasn't a queen I would see queen cells. So I would wait another couple of weeks and check to find No luck so I would try again by adding more brood. This went on for a while like 2 and a half months so Finally I shook all the bees out around the side of the garage and added 2 nice frames of larvae and brood and a queen cell. The next time I inspected two weeks later. Boom there was a queen and the hive looked good. You may have to shake them out. If I have a laying worker again I won't hesitate to shake the whole thing out and then add a queencell and brood. Those laying workers caused my trying to add a queen to fail repeatedly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,076 Posts
I'll give an answer to your original question about how many bees it takes to produce a healthy queen cell. About 600 bees "of the right age" can produce one queen cell. This is why commercial queen breeders make up a starter box with up to 15 pounds of bees so they can start about 60 to 90 cells at one time. The key is the part about right age. Bees from 3 days up to 2 weeks old can produce royal jelly. Older bees can produce royal jelly but never in the quantity and quality of younger bees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Fusion - Now that is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top