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Re: Nuk usage

You're bees would outgrow the boxes too fast.
I don't know what would happen if you stacked 4 nuc boxes for 1 hive.
 

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Re: Nuk usage

I do they would tip over and still not be enough room! There's a reason why Langstroth equipment has been the mainstay for over 100 yrs., it's cheap, it's very workable and the bees do well in it.
 

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Re: Nuk usage

I am thinking that it might be prone to topple if you have high winds. I would imagine that you probably would have 6 to 8 nucs stacked on top of each other.
 

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I have over wintered in 5 frame nuc's for yrs now. I also do hives that way as in 5-6 boxes tall. it makes it easy to work them if you have a bad back. also it resembles a natural [tree] but you can take it apart to remove honey or inspect it. its all in what you like.
D
 

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5-frame nucs are terrific. Mostly I keep them stacked two boxes high and when customers come to pick up their nucs I transfer the bees to their boxes, the best 5-frames out of the ten available and most of the bees, then I just give what's left a new ripe queen cell, and soon they're going strong again.

They're good for many other purposes, as well. I really like how they work to correct colonies that are in need of new queens or even many of those who appear to be hopelessly queenless. Fabulous weak colony boosters.

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More on the actual subject of this thread- during the honey flow I am continuously robbing combs of honey from the nucs, replacing them with foundationless frames. Though it may be very labor intensive, nucs can be used as honey producing colonies - this way they are also comb producing colonies.
 

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It would be very labor intensive to keep them from swarming and for honey production, If you dont want 10 frame equipment use 8 frame, I like my 8 frame equipment.
 

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Joseph is right. Depends on what you wish to use them for. Selling Nucs, the stack would never reach more than a couple high, then be sold. Stacked a couple high is less likely to blow over. Don't forget, they propolis everything together and the weight of drawn comb frames adds some good weight too. We're talking 35-50mph gusts in the open. Who has their hives in the open exposed to wind ?
 

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... Selling Nucs, the stack would never reach more than a couple high, then be sold. ..
The original question is not about selling nucs. It is about using nuc boxes for the colony, (the brood and honey supers.) Seems like a precarious tower to manage, say four 5-frame deeps for brood alone, then who knows how many more honey supers on top of that in a strong flow.

Does the original poster have some benefits in mind to consider?

Wayne
 

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5-frame nucs are terrific. Mostly I keep them stacked two boxes high and when customers come to pick up their nucs I transfer the bees to their boxes, the best 5-frames out of the ten available and most of the bees, then I just give what's left a new ripe queen cell, and soon they're going strong again.

They're good for many other purposes, as well. I really like how they work to correct colonies that are in need of new queens or even many of those who appear to be hopelessly queenless. Fabulous weak colony boosters.

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More on the actual subject of this thread- during the honey flow I am continuously robbing combs of honey from the nucs, replacing them with foundationless frames. Though it may be very labor intensive, nucs can be used as honey producing colonies - this way they are also comb producing colonies.
I plan on keeping 2 body deep 5 frame nucs for the purpose of of overwintering and helping weaker colonies in the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My thought include these items:

Weight control ... due to leg / heart / hip problems, I mostly work from a chair.

Bees seem to build upward whenever they can.

What about using 8 frame equipment with some sort of a filler to take up the extra space for 3 of the frames. That would be more stable and volume expandible if needed.

I expect to have 2 - 4 hives in my backyard and intend to let them do-their-thing as much as possible. I don't plan to sell anything...I only hope to get honey for the extended family.
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One issue if you working from a chair will be height. You might be better to go with 10 frame and have a device, commercial device or homemade, to lift the upper suppers. 2 story 8 frames get a little unruly and swarmy if you miss a beat and really are not much lighter than 10 frame because they always plug the brood chambers with honey.

Check for some links, equipment is out there to help you. Kudo's to you for not letting lifes difficulties keep you confined in the house, I lived near you I'd come over and help.
 

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You could make a lot of "dummy" boards (Follower boards or whatever you like to call them) and use only seven frames in an eight frame box easily. If you wanted to make something even more restricting, you could make them fatter and get it down to six frames in an eight frame box. Yes, that would limit the weight even more, as would using all shallows (I use all mediums and the weight never gets over 50 pounds a super). I thiink I'd be more prone to use the standard follower type boards in an all eight frame shallow arrangement. That way they would be seven shallow frames. if I wanted to keep the weight below 50 pounds. That would be more like 25 pounds.
 

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Nobody has made this suggestion, so I will...
With some of you physical limitations that you have described, why not consider a 4 ft long Top bar Hive? If you are not familiar with what it is, do a search on the Home Page. Good Luck!!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Actually I have been considering both above options.

The TBH looks really interesting. I will be getting new bees (total loss last year) on deep frames (nuk) in the spring so I have time to build and research methods on moving the to top bars from the frames.

I can stand, but only minutes at a time.

Mr Bush, can you link me to your info, please.

Should I move this to the TBH area at this point or can it continue here?

I think this may be the best answer for me.
 
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