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This year, I'm planning to learn how to make new hives by using nucs. I have a question.

1. When make a nuc do you use pollen, honey and brood from the same hive or can you make them with honey from one hive and pollen and brood for a different hive?
 

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It depends on where the resources are. If they are spread out on different size frames, in different sized supers, it can be more difficult. If all your supers and frames are the same size, it is fairly easy to make up nucs by taking the various resources from hives that have the resources to spare. Hives with pollen, honey, and hives with sealed/emerging brood. Though sometimes I've had colonies that became very strong and were also overly defensive, so I've taken them apart completely, making as many nucs as their resources permit, destroying their original queen and giving each nuc a cultured queen cell. Even then missing resources can be made up from other hives that have the resources to spare.

It is sometimes better to be sure to initially have adult bees, in each nuc, from only one contributing colony; frames of honey, pollen, and sealed/emerging brood can be from any hive, sometimes if you mix adult bees from different hives, they will fight, and you will have many dead bees, and a weak and struggling nuc.

There are many ways to boost the populations of struggling nucs. I like to harvest house/nurse bees from my strongest hives by shaking bees from different hives, together on the cover of a nuc box with empty combs, I keep the cover ajar so there is a wide opening, along one side, for the bees that choose to join together and enter the nuc, to do so. House/nurse bees will readily join together and enter the nuc; older, field bees will promptly fly off to return to their parent colony. I then move the nuc full of house/nurse bees into my nuc yard for the night and feed them plenty of sugar syrup (they definitely realize they are queenless by the next morning). These house/nurse bees that are queenless can be added to any colony that needs a population boost, without incident. If I'm pressed for time, or the boost is critical, I don't even wait, adding the boost bees right after collecting them. Another way is to use frames of emerging brood, if you have them to spare.
 

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You can certainly use different colonies to make up your nucs. You can take brood from some colonies and bees from another.

For bees, use a very strong colony. Remove covers and place an excluder on top. Remove frames of brood and honey/pollen from whatever colonies you want...I usually used 2 sealed and one open...and shake off bees back into colony they came from. Add these frames to empty body and place it on colony with excluder. Something like...honey, sealed, sealed, open, pollen, honey.

Add additional empty comb at sides and cover overnight. Bees re-populate combs. Next day your nuc is well stocked with young bees and no queen.
 
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