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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are some pics of my 5 frame nuc bodies?
My question is that if I can make deep hive bodies with this type of wood. I don't know what the style is called but it is a bunch of grooved small cedar pieces glued together to make larger boards.
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Not a thing wrong with jointing pieces of wood together to make large boards. you can buy them already made if you wanted to. The biggest concern will be quality of glue you used to join them together. I would also opt for a finger joint to do it.

Do to the term finger joint being used on this forum I will offer this to help clear things up. this is a link to a finger joint.
http://www.toolstoday.com/p-5842-fi...&gdftrk=gdfV22404_a_7c1444_a_7c6025_a_7c45796

It is pretty common for finger joint and Box joint to be used for what those here are making box joints with. But this is a true finger joint and is used to join boards edge to edge. There are other ways to get it done and it is a common method to get more use out of otherwise scrap wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought the boards premanufactured and primed. For making the box, I used shiplap. So are these boards comparable to solid wood. I get the 1x12's for 60 cents a foot. TIA
 

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I made some screened bottom boards (which I have yet to use) out of similar wood -- basically finger- joined and glued cedar strip. I think in my area it was intended to be used as molding or similar uses and painted really well -- although it has been my experience that cedar doesn't take paint really well.

Some of the longer left over scraps I used to hold up plants in my garden and they did not hold up well to rain and weather. Therefore, I am skeptical about how they will hold up as bottom boards. I am going to try it but I'm guessing that I will probably be replacing them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Painting wasn't a problem because they were pre-primed. And hopefully it does well as a deep box or super when I paint it well
 

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I bought the boards premanufactured and primed. For making the box, I used shiplap. So are these boards comparable to solid wood. I get the 1x12's for 60 cents a foot. TIA
Comparing to "Solid Wood" is a bit of a range. You have everything from the near garbage pine boards to finish or furniture grade boards. SO it is not as easy as a yes or no question. but say that board not hardly worth selling at all is one end of the scale and finish grade boards are the other end. You can actually take lower grade wood and make higher grade boards out of them. So in all I will say you stand to improve the grade of the boards you have. Assuming you use a quality glue for exterior use and get good fitting joints. Yeah it just keeps gettign more and more if's to it. It will also make the boards paint grade rather than stain grade. Not something you woudl normally be concerned about unless you are making a yard art type of hive.

In all I woudl say you will improve the wood you have though. It would not be done more often because of all the extra time and effort involved.
 
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